Sue A2

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

Friday, February 28, 2014
Rachel Joyce
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry

Harold writes a response to a message from a long ago friend but when he walks to post his note, he just keeps on walking. This story seems as if it is going to be a simple tale, but events that happen along his way make this an extraordinary tale of a true personal journey. Humor, social statements, reaction of family and friends, and the impact of Harold's choices make for a delightful but thought provoking read. Check Our Catalog

Sue A2, Reference

Last Night at the Lobster

Sunday, April 13, 2008
Stewart O'Nan

Set on the last day of business of a Connecticut Red Lobster, this tells the story of Manny DeLeon, a conscientious, committed restaurant manager any national chain would want to keep. Instead, corporate has notified Manny that his—and Manny does think of the restaurant as his—location is not meeting expectations and will close December 20. On this last night, Manny is committed to a dream of perfection, but no one and nothing seems to share his vision. Small but not slight, the novel is a concise, poignant portrait of a man on the verge of losing himself. I would recommend this to anyone who has ever had a job or a relationship.

Sue A2, Reference

Check the catalog

 

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

Sunday, April 13, 2008
Chip Heath and Dan Heath

Why do some ideas thrive while others die? How do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators, and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. The brothers assert that “sticky” messages of all kinds—from the infamous “organ theft ring” hoax to a coach’s lessons on sportsmanship to a product vision statement from Sony—draw their power from the same six traits. It’s a fast-paced tour of idea success stories (and failures)—the Nobel Prize-winning scientist who drank a glass of bacteria to prove a point about stomach ulcers; the charities who make use of the Mother Teresa Effect; the elementary-school teacher’s simulation that actually prevented prejudice. This book was written for everyday people and may be applied to everyday life.

Sue A2, Reference

Check the Catalog

Maus (I & II)

Monday, January 28, 2008
Art Spiegelman

A memoir of sorts, presented in graphic novel (cartoon) format.

Maus ties together two powerful stories: Vladek Spiegleman - a Jewish survivor of Hitler's Europe, and his son - a cartoonist trying to come to terms with his father. The unique style allows the reader to experience Vladek's tale as he is relating it to his son.

This is the first graphic novel I have ever read - although I read lots of comic books as a kid! The conversational tone allowed bits of history to be interspersed with household chores. I felt as if I knew the Spiegelman family by the end.

Sue A 2, Reference

Check the catalog

LIBRARY TWEETS

Follow Us on Twitter