Jeanne S.

The Boys who challenged Hitler: Knud Pedersen and the Churchill Club

Wednesday, February 15, 2017
Phillip Hoose
The Boys who challenged Hitler
Fifteen-year-old Knud Pedersen was outraged when the officials of his homeland, Denmark, let the Nazis take over the country without a fight.  He, his brother and some of his school friends decided to take matters into their own hands and sabotage the Germans. It started with changing road signs so the Nazis would get lost. After a while the group grew in size and courage and knowledge and soon important buildings used by the enemy  were bombed.  The Nazis grew frustrated with the Churchill Club (the boys named their club after Winston Churchill) and tracked them down.  But their efforts were not in vain; their courage sparked a full-blown Danish resistance.  The author, Phillip Hoose, was able to interview Knud Pedersen before he died to get the facts straight and tell a fascinating story. Check our catalog
 
Jeanne S., Youth Services

Pall in the Family

Friday, October 28, 2016
Dawn Eastman
Pall in the Family

I’m always excited to find a new cozy mystery series and this one takes place in MICHIGAN!! Clyde, a female police officer in Ann Arbor, is originally from Crystal Haven on the west coast of Michigan. When something goes terribly wrong in Ann Arbor, she comes home to family--a family full of psychics and tarot readers. Clyde denies she has any talent in that arena but when a psychic is killed, can she deny it anymore? A fast paced book with some great secondary characters.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Jeanne S., Youth Services

 

Learning to Swear in America

Monday, August 29, 2016
Katie Kennedy
Learning to Swear in America

Yuri, a 17-year-old physics prodigy from Russia, is on his way to America to help save California from a big bad asteroid—a very big, very bad asteroid that could take out Japan with a tsunami. His knowledge of English is very good but he doesn’t know how to swear in English. Many of the much older physicists don’t believe this kid has any knowledge that can help this very serious situation. Yuri meets Dovie, a normal teenage girl and he learns what it’s really like to be a teenager. You will laugh out loud, cry a bit, and cheer on this pair of teens that could, might, maybe save the world.

An extra bit of knowledge: Ms. Kennedy is from the U.P. of Michigan and this is her first novel. I am hoping for many more.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Jeanne S., Youth Services

Dead Meat: A Brady Coyne Mystery

Wednesday, July 6, 2016
William G. Tapply
Dead Meat: A Brady Coyne Mystery

My husband found this author when hunting through the stacks at a library and found a book about fishing. Tapply was an avid angler, and so is his attorney protagonist Brady Coyne. Coyne lives in Boston but, in this book, is in Maine at a resort for, you guessed it, fishing. This series makes for fun reading. Much talk about fishing and cooking, and always some love interest, but, as my husband says, nothing like a romance novel--not that he has ever read one. Unfortunately, William Tapply passed away a few years ago, so I savor the 25 books in the series.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Jeanne S., Youth Services

Without You, There Would Be No Us

Monday, May 9, 2016
Suki Kim
Without You, There Would Be No Us: My Time with the Sons of North Korea's Elite

My Time with the Sons of North Korea's Elite

 

In 2011 all the universities in North Korea were closed, the students sent to construction jobs. All but the 270 male students at the Pyongyang University of Science and Technology. These were the sons of the North Korean elite. Journalist Suki Kim posed as a missionary to teach at Pyongyang University and learn about the secretive country. What she had to do in order to get to North Korea, what she needed to bring with her, and what she endured for a school year in North Korea makes for a fascinating and informative read.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Jeanne S., Youth Services

 

My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life

Monday, March 14, 2016
Ruth Reichl
My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life

Ruth Reichl was the editor-in-chief of Gourmet magazine. When it closed unexpectedly in 2009, Ruth was devastated.

This colorful cookbook/memoir is the story of how Ms. Reichl used food to help her cope and recover from her loss. Gourmet was an intimidating magazine for me--so many recipes used unheard-of ingredients in little old Livingston County--but I have personally flagged 22 recipes that I want to try. Maybe my co-workers will be my guinea pigs!

Check our catalog for this book.

Jeanne S., Youth Services

Daughters of the Samurai: A Journey from East to West and Back

Thursday, January 28, 2016
Janice P. Nimura
Daughters of the Samurai

As a history buff, I enjoy reading history and, when I find an event that is new to me, it is doubly enjoyable.

In 1871, after being isolated for over 200 years, the Japanese government sent five young girls, ages 6 to 14, to America. They were to learn our ways and help nurture a new generation to lead Japan. Only three of the girls stayed for the ten-year journey. They traveled the country, learned English, and made life-long friends. Upon returning to a country that was now foreign to them, the three young ladies had many decisions to make.

The author has written a scholarly but very readable work covering the history of the Samurai in Japan, the opening of Japan to the Western world, and the education and life of three very strong and brave young women.

Check our catalog.

Jeanne S., Youth Services

LIBRARY TWEETS