Holly W.

Sandstorm

Wednesday, July 21, 2010
James Rollins

I love when I get the chances to talk books while I’m checking books out for people.  Excitement over a favorite author inspires me to try something new, an author that I never would have discovered on my own.  Enter James Rollins’s Sigma Force, a special unit within the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (which oversees the research-and-development are of the Department of Defense).  Sigma Force’s job is to protect and maintain the technological superiority of the United States.  An unexplainable explosion at the British Museum, antimatter, a partner’s betrayal, a lost city buried beneath the Arabian Desert all just pieces of a much larger puzzle that is the thrill ride that starts on page one and doesn’t let go.  Sandstorm is just the beginning of the Sigma Force series.



Note- I used MelCat to interloan Sandstorm.  Haven’t tried MelCat?  Just ask at any desk and we’ll get you started.

Holly, Youth Services

Storm Prey

Wednesday, June 30, 2010
John Sandford

There are numerous crime/police procedural series out there, and I've read parts of many.  But the series that I'm always waiting for the next one to be published is Sandford's Prey series starring Lucas Davenport.  Lucas, who sometimes has trouble following the rules, has had an interesting career path from police officer in the The Twin Cities to his current role at the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.  Along the way there have been numerous relationships, friendships and plenty of "bad guys" needing to be caught.  One warning to readers - the crimes in the Prey series tend to be violent and the language can be rough.  Storm Prey (the 20th in the series) didn't disappoint.

The crime, a robbery of the Minnesota Medical Research Center's pharmacy, should have been a piece of cake as it was an inside job.  It was just meant to be a robbery, but ends up being much more.  Factor in that Weather (Lucas' wife) sees the robbers as they exit the parking garage, the surgery that Weather is team member on, and the attempt that is made on Weather's life and it's off and running in typical Sandford fashion.  Being obsessive-compulsive about reading series, I'd recommend starting with the first (Rules of Prey) originally published in 1989) and reading up to Storm Prey.  If you end up hooked like me, you'll be happy to know that there are a couple of other characters that Sandford chronicles as well.  FYI - John Sandford is the pseudonym of Pulitzer Prize winning journalest John Camp.


Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

Forgotten Ellis Island: the Extraordinary Story of America's Immigrant Hospital

Monday, May 19, 2008
Lorie Conway

Most of us know something of Ellis Island and the amazing number of immigrants who entered the United States in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty.We study the hows and whys that so many left their native countries and traveled here.We know of the terrible conditions that many traveled in on the long journeys.But, did you ever stop to think of the number of immigrants who arrived on the shore of Ellis Island ill or carrying a contagious disease?What happened to those people?

Enter America’s Immigrant Hospital.“The hospital was massive and modern- 22 state-of-the-art buildings crammed onto two small islands, which were man-made from rock and dirt excavated during the building of the New York subway system.” (page 5).Read about the controversy surrounding ill immigrants, the building of the hospital, the staff that provided amazing care, and the patients.This is a fascinating look at an extraordinary institution, filled with photos of both then and now.Lorie Conway produced a documentary about the hospital, and this is the companion book.I haven’t been able to find a copy of the documentary available for purchase, but I’ll keep looking.

Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

Black Duck (Book on CD)

Sunday, April 13, 2008
Janet Taylor Lisle

It's the Spring of 1929 on the New England shore... Prohibition... Smuggling Liquor... and a dead body found on the beach.

So begins Black Duck the story of Ruben and Jeddy and their, along with most of those in the small community, involvement in rum-running. Black Duck is a wonderful piece of historical fiction that will have you on the edge of your seats at times. The author’s note at the end of the audio tells of the actual events that inspired the story.

Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

100 Cupboards (Book on CD)

Tuesday, March 25, 2008
N. D. Wilson

One of those books on CD where I found myself wanting to drive for the sole purpose of listening! You know, where you sit in the garage for as long as you can get away with. Plus, I found myself telling everyone – adults and kids- how much I was enjoying the story. The back of the book on CD summed it up nicely…

“Twelve-year-old Henry York is going to sleep one night when he hears a bump on the attic wall above his head. It’s an unfamiliar house- Henry is staying with his aunt, uncle and three cousins- so he tries to ignore it. But the next night he wakes up with bits of plaster in his hair. Two knobs have broken through the wall, and one of them is slowing turning….

Henry scrapes the plaster off the wall and discovers doors- ninety-nine cupboards of all different sizes and shapes. Through one he can hear the sound of falling rain. Through another he sees a glowing room- with a man strolling back and forth! Henry and his cousin Henrietta soon understand that these are not just cupboards. They are, in fact, portals to other worlds.”

And the best part…100 Cupboards in the first of a new fantasy adventure! A great listen for ALL AGES.

Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

Author Russell Freedman...

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

I discovered Russell Freedman when I stumbled acrossEleanor Roosevelt: a life of Discovery.I enjoyed the book so much; I ended up naming our cats Franklin and Eleanor.Russell Freedman draws you into his current subject and doesn’t let you go.I eagerly await his new titles.The latest is Who Was First? Discovering the Americas. Freedman writes for the teen audience, but he pays them the same respect as one would an adult audience and thoroughly researches his subjects.After reading The Worst Hard Time by Timothy Egan (Livingston Reads! 2008 selection) I picked up Freedman’sChildren of the Great Depression.Give Freedman a try, regardless if you are no longer in the “teen audience”, you will be surprised by what you find.

Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

Dead Girls Don't Write Letters

Sunday, February 24, 2008
Gail Giles

Sunny describes her mom as “too depressed to take antidepressants” and it is Sunny’s job to take care of pretty much everything. And Sunny is managing. Until the day the letter arrives – the letter from Sunny’s sister Jazz. The sister who died in a fire. Dead girls don’t write letters. Then the girl arrives claiming to be Jazz… Just what is happening?

Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

A Northern Light (Book & Book on CD)

Sunday, February 24, 2008
Jennifer Donnelly

Think about what it means to make a promise...

It’s 1906 in up state New York.Mattie made a promise to her dying mother – to stay on the farm, helping her father raising her younger siblings.But Mattie wants to go to college.She has a way with words and a scholarship waiting.To help make ends meet, Mattie takes a job at one of the summer resorts.Here she makes another promise- to burn some letters for a guest.But before she does, the guest ends up dead.Does one have to keep a promise to a dead person?Even when it means giving up one’s dreams of college?Or when the letters could help solve the mystery surrounding a death?

Holly, Youth Services

Check the catalog

Ida B…and her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster and (Possibly) Save the World (Book & Book on CD)

Sunday, February 24, 2008
Katherine Hannigan
Ida B…and her Plans to Maximize Fun, Avoid Disaster and (Possibly) Save the Worl

I’m Ida B., not Ida that’s my Mama, but Ida B. Life is pretty good here on the farm with Mama, Daddy, Rufus our dog and Lula our cat. I’m home schooled, I tried kindergarten for 3 weeks at the Ernest B. Lawson Elementary School, but it wasn’t for me. After doing my school work there is lots to do here. I talk with the trees in the apple orchard – yes, talk. All the trees have names and if you listen closely they answer. I also talk with the brook that runs through our farm. Daddy always says that we don’t own the earth; we are the earth’s caretakers and that we should leave our land better than we found it.
And then Mama found a lump and the lump had cancer, and Daddy sold some of our land, and they cut down my friends the trees and now I have to go to 4th grade at the stupid Ernest B. Lawson Elementary School. What am I going to do?

Check the catalog.

Holly, Youth Services

Holding Up the Earth

Monday, January 28, 2008

I was raised in a home that my parents built when I was 5 years old.So I know the history of the house.I currently live in a home built in 1927 and I often wonder about the history of the house. I know a little of the history through the original deed I was given when we purchased the house.For instance, the property was originally owned by one of the McPherson brothers of Howell.Technically I live in the McPherson subdivision in Lansing.But what I really wonder about is the people who lived there before us and what their lives where like.I want that personal glimpse into the past….

When Hope was 8 years old, her mother was killed in a car accident.Hope, now 14, has bounced around from foster home to foster home.Sarah, her current foster mom is different than the others.But Hope has long given up on the thought of adoption.Sarah and Hope travel from Minneapolis one summer to Nebraska and the farm where Sarah was raised.While there, Anna, Sarah’s mother, shares the history of four generations of young women who have lived on the farm.Through letters, Hope learns of Abigail’s struggles in 1869-1870 when the property was homesteaded. Rebecca’s diary tells of her time as the hired girl in the summer of 1900.Anna tells her own story of June1936.And finally, Sarah shares her own diary of 1963 with Hope.Will the farm capture Hope’s heart as it did those before her?

 

The reviewer in Horn Book said it best:

“The stories of five teenaged girls – separated by decades, but joined by their love of a Nebraska farm- are pieced together like a patchwork quilt in this first novel…A carefully structured work full of recurring connections and patterns, peopled with strong female characters.”

Holly, Youth Services

Chcek the catalog

LIBRARY TWEETS

Follow Us on Twitter