Geralyn B.

Mutant Message Down Under

Thursday, February 11, 2010
Marlo Morgan

This is a fictional account of a woman that travels to Australia. While there, she is summoned by a tribe of Aborigines. Her understanding is that she is to receive an award. She blindly travels in an open jeep dressed to the nines far into the Outback. Once she arrives at her destination with the “Real People” she is stripped of everything she has in her possession (credit cards, keys, ID, clothes). She is given a cotton covering to hide her physical body. She is then led on a 4 month journey through the Outback with her Aboriginal companions that treat her like one of their own. She has to endure the environmental differences (her feet become like hoofs from walking on the desert), living discomforts (eating worms & sleeping on the ground) and language differences. Each day the group walks in no particular direction with little baggage (no food or water-they have to rely on what is provided along the way). She learns that she has been “chosen” to spread the message taught to her during her walkabout that humankind needs to better honor all living things—plants, animals, & the earth. This book reinforced the message to me to be more appreciative of all that we have—water, air, food, housing, etc. and the environmental/health concerns that we are facing. When I mentioned reading this book to my spiritual friends, they said that they had read the book years ago & appreciated the message that it speaks. I am now reading Marlo Morgan’s book, Message From Forever. We need to envision a healthy “Mother Earth."

Geralyn B., Technical Services

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North County: a personal journey through the borderland

Thursday, February 11, 2010
Howard Frank Mosher

I noticed the book when I was checking it out to a patron, otherwise I wouldn’t have found it because it was written in 1997 and I don’t normally look for books shelved in 917.304. Mosher describes his solo trip from the east coast of Maine to the western shores of California. He follows little traveled, sometimes impassable highways and byways between the United States into Canada. He travels with little baggage, mainly his fishing gear and journals to transcribe his experiences. His goal was to fish in the many rivers and lakes in the “North Country” and to meet the local townspeople in villages with populations sometimes under 25 people. Some of the characters he meets are smugglers that transport illegal items across the border. I will probably read another book by Mosher (fiction; copyrighted 2003) that we have in our collection called The true account: concerning a Vermont gentleman's race to the Pacific against and exploration of the western American continent coincident to the expedition of Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark because I enjoy accounts of exploration and experiencing nature.

Geralyn B., Technical Services

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Into the Wild

Sunday, February 24, 2008
Jon Krakauer

Into the wild is a biography about Christopher McCandless written by Jon Krakauer. Christopher, who referred to himself as “Alexander Supertramp” was a voyageur who preferred to get “lost” in the wildness of this Earth that we live on. Much like Henry David Thoreau, “Alex” relished in the challenges of surviving “off the land” rather than in the challenges in the society of man. After donating his $25,000 in savings to a charity, and abandoning his Datsun, his “car-less” wanderings took him through various “wild” trails in Arizona, Colorado, Mexico, California, Idaho, Montana, North Dakota, and Alaska. Unfortunately, Chris perished along the Stampede Trail near Fairbanks, Alaska.

There are passages and quotes from books by Jack London, Mark Twain, Leo Tolstoy, John Muir, Henry David Thoreau, and others in the book Into the Wild, because books by these authors were found with Chris’s remains and had been highlighted. Jon Krakauer had also written an article about this adventure story in Outside magazine. The library will be adding the movie about the book to our collection in March.

Geralyn, Technical Services & Circulation

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