The Nazi officer's wife : how one Jewish woman survived the Holocaust

Wednesday, July 29, 2015
Edith Hahn Beer with Susan Dworkin
The Nazi officer's wife : how one Jewish woman survived the Holocaust

This was a fascinating memoir of a Jewish woman who was forced into a labor camp by the Gestapo and  later with the help of a Christian friend, changed her name and went underground.  She met and fell in love with a  Nazi officer who married her and  her secret even when she confessed that she was a jew.  The book is the story of her survival under terrible odds and was a difficult and emotional read but well worth the time I spent. 

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Sue N., Youth Services

Minding the Manor

Friday, October 24, 2014
Mollie Moran
Minding the Manor

The Memoir of a 1930s English Kitchen Maid


This is a really interesting book, kind of like Downton Abbey, only all real. A fun read full of facts of the household "goings-on," the staff or help, and the family from the author's memories of life as a young kitchen maid (or scullery maid) in 1930s England. It includes Mollie's rise to become a cook. The book also describes the lovely villages and area in England and contains lots of insight of life in pre-WWII England. The lady who wrote this book was in her 90s and she is brilliant!

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Marilyn S., Circulation

Rod: The Autobiography

Saturday, August 16, 2014
Rod Stewart

Rod Stewart.  Rock & Roll, blondes and rooster hair equals Rod Stewart to most people.  Turns out he's a total model railroad geek AND a family man.  Now after more than five decades in the spotlight, he is finally ready to take a candid and romping look back at his life both on and off the stage. From his humble British roots to his hell-raising years on tour with his bandmates, not forgetting his great loves (including three marriages and eight children) and decades touring the world, Rod delivers a riveting ride through one of rock's most remarkable lives. And enjoyable read - and his model railroad buildings, cities, etc. are a wonder to behold.  Check the Catalog

Diane, Administration

Border Crossings: Coming of Age in the Czech Resistance

Wednesday, April 30, 2014
Charles Novacek

This memoir reads like a spy novel.  Charles was taught to be part of the Czech resistance as an 11 year old boy when the Nazi’s invaded his homeland in 1939.  Few of us know of the arduous stories of people in Eastern Europe who endured the hardships of World War II and then the oppression of Communism afterwards.  This amazingly true story tells of       cunning, bravery, strength, fortitude and a belief in a bright future despite terrifying circumstances.  After torture and imprisonment and a harrowing escape in 1948, Charles was able to get to a displaced-persons camp in Germany, then to venezuela and finally was able to immigrate with his family to the U.S. in the 1950s.  He became a civil engineer in Detroit and a model citizen. Highly recommended.

Kathleen Zaenger, Administration

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A Story Lately Told: Coming of Age in Ireland, London and New York

Tuesday, March 11, 2014
Angelica Huston
A Story Lately Told

This memoir by Angelica Huston is an interesting glimpse at a different sort of celebrity childhood.  The daughter of celebrated director and actor John Huston and his fourth wife, former ballerina Enrica Soma, she was raised on an estate in rural Ireland.  While it would seem to be idyllic, her parents were often gone working and travelling, leaving Angelica and her brother, Tony, with nannies, tutors and servants.  Although she had every privilege, she describes it as an often lonely time.  Her parents separated when she was a teen, and her mother took her children with her to live in London.  This was the swinging '60s, the days of Flower Power and psychedelia.  After playing a role in a movie directed by her father, and the early death of her mother, Angelica decided she would rather model and headed to Paris where she was fairly successful.  However, she also began a romance with a much older photographer, a man that was very unstable; a drug user who was often violent toward her.  After four years of trying to make that work, she left for Hollywood to live with her father and his fifth wife. 

There the story ends in her early adulthood.  A second volume will be published later this year.  I enjoyed this memoir, and am looking forward to the sequel.  The descriptions of Ireland are lovely, and really evoke the beauty and loneliness of that time in Ms. Huston's life.  My only disappointment would be the lack of pictures.  There are only a few small, grainy, black and white photos at the start of each chapter.  Hopefully that will be remedied in volume two. Check our Catalog

Pat P., Tech Services

This just In: What I couldn't Tell You on TV

Tuesday, August 13, 2013
Bob Schieffer
This Just In: What I Couldn't Tell You On TV

As a news junkie I love stories about the news and the news shows that I love to watch. Among my favorites are Meet the Press and Face the Nation. Bob Schieffer has been on the list of my favorite broadcasters so I really enjoyed his own story of his career in journalism and his coverage of some of the most important events in history from 1960 to the present. I was reminded of many events over the last 40 years and I heard some "insider" information that was new to me. I listened to this book on audio on a long car trip and it was read by the author so a very good voice to listen to! Check the catalog for the book Check the catalog for audio book

Jan K. Youth Services

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

Saturday, May 11, 2013
Cheryl Strayed
Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail

At 25 years old Cheryl Strayed decided to hike more than 1,000 miles on the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to Washington State-alone. After the death of her mother and a divorce, with no real direction for her life she uses the time backpacking to heal and rediscover who she is. She has no experience with backpacking and she describes in detail what she learns and experiences on her journey. Being I will never hike this trail it was fun to read and live it through someone else's experience!  Check the catalog.

Jan K. Youth Services

Suzanne Collins

Saturday, March 16, 2013
Kerrily Sapet
Suzanne Collins

Since the Hunger Games series is so popular, I decided to read a biography of the author, Suzanne Collins. It was fascinating and I think the teens will enjoy it. All the things that led up to the sereis is discussed as well as the making of the movie. We have quite a few other books and series by Collins such as Gregor the Overlander books which are very popular. Short and very enjoyable read. Check our Catalog

Sue N. Youth Services

Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

Tuesday, January 8, 2013
Susannah Cahalan
Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness

At age twenty-four, Susannah Cahalan's world fell apart.  Suddenly, the lights were too bright and colors were too vivid.  There was anxiety...fear.  She could "hear" what others were thinking about her.  And it wasn't good.  She was delusional.  The first doctor said it was due to her lifestyle - on the fast track at the New York Post, excessive partying, lack of sleep, too much alcohol.   But her family knew better.  She endured a "month of madness" while doctors ruled out what she didn't have.  Until one day, when life looked its bleakest, another young brilliant mind joined the team.  Susannah was in hell...could they bring her back?  Was there a cure or was she resigned to a psych ward...or worse?  Could her problems be caused by something physical?  

Great Book!   I couldn't help but think about the number of people who have suffered because of how little we know.  I could not put this book down until I finished. Check our catalog.

Donna O., Reference

My Mother Was Nuts

Thursday, November 1, 2012
Penny Marshall

This is an odd book.  Prior to reading this, I had always liked Penny Marshall.  She has had an interesting life, no doubt about it.  It is a very easy to read book, very conversational.  You can all but hear Penny speaking with that distinctive voice as you read it.  But in this book, there is no insight into how she felt about the things that happened to her.  There was no demonstration of the way that she may or may not have been affected by some of these extraordinary events.   She certainly has had a lot of ups and many downs.  She had a lot of success and some hardships as well.  However, this is just a chronological list of these events, told with more name-dropping than I have ever seen in a Hollywood memoir. After reading this book, I actually like Ms. Marshall a lot less than I did before.  She made a lot of the same bad choices over and over, and some of them were disturbing.  If her brother had not already been a big success, it's highly unlikely she would have had a career in Hollywood.  It’s like there’s not a person in there, just kind of shallow and not very grateful.  It was also not very funny, which is surprising as well.  Thumbs down from me, save your time for a more worthwhile book.   Check our catalog. 

Pat P., Tech Services




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