Nonfiction

Better than before : mastering the habits of our everyday lives

Thursday, June 11, 2015
Gretchen Rubin
Better than before : mastering the habits of our everyday lives

Gretchen Rubin illustrates the core principles of habit formation with dozens of strategies that she uses herself and tests out on others. She presents a practical, concrete framework to allow readers to understand their habits—and to change them for good.  I like the idea of being better than I currently am. I like self-help books.  I am fascinated with the idea that if I make something a habit I won’t have to think about it anymore, I will just do it.  Will I really exercise regularly, eat what will make me feel and act better, not procrastinate, etc?  We are not all the same.  There is a quiz at the back of the book so you can determine whether you are an Upholder, a Questioner, an Obliger or a Rebel.  Each individual forms habits differently depending upon which you are.  And you may overlap and have tendencies from more than one group. I especially like the last two sentences on the book jacket. “Change is possible. When we master our habits, we can make our lives better than before.” I am going to continue working on good habits – so that I don’t come home in the evening, crash and eat every carb I can get my hands on. I will have a plan and hopefully it will be a habit so I will automatically do the healthful thing. At least it is worth a try! This book held my interest.  I wanted to know what she had to say on the subject and she backed up her ideas with research. I have even looked at her blog which has more good ideas  Check our Catalog

Betsy H., Reference

the life-changing magic of tidying up

Saturday, June 6, 2015
marie kondo
the life-changing magic of tidying up

“This international bestseller featuring Tokyo’s newest lifestyle phenomenon will help you clear you clutter and enjoy the unique magic of a tidy home – and the calm, motivated mindset it can inspire.”  With a claim like that, I had to give the life-changing magic of tidying up: the Japanese are of decluttering and organizing a try.  I’m a saver, a have piles of stuff, and boxes of stuff.  I become emotionally attached to objects.  I hate to throw away stuff that is still in usable condition.  But clutter is stressful and it needs to go!  Kondo’s approach definitely has an eastern feel, but ultimately it makes sense to me.  First answer the question of why you want to tidy up? Then approach your belongings in a certain order and for each item ask “does this bring me joy?”  Realize that objects serve a purpose and once they have fulfilled that purpose, it’s time for things to go.  The book is easy to read, written in small sections allowing you to read a little at a time if you choose.  Good Luck if you take on this decluttering approach.  Check the catalog for the hard cover.  Check the catalog for the audio CD.

Holly, Youth Services

Blind curves : a woman, a motorcycle, and a journey to reinvent herself

Friday, June 5, 2015
Linda Crill
Blind curves : a woman, a motorcycle, and a journey to reinvent herself

“Blind curves: a woman, a motorcycle, and a journey to reinvent herself” by Linda Crill and the true story/movie “Wild: from lost to found on the Pacific Crest Trail” by Cheryl Strayed have similar storylines. Both of these true “adventures” are taken by women after suffering a loss of a relationship. These individuals have strong “backbones” and challenge themselves to risks. Linda in “Blind curves” learns to ride a motorcycle just before she joins 3 other individuals on a 2,500 mile round trip on the West Coast from Vancouver, Canada to Mendocino, California. After “laying” a motorcycle down on top of herself during her motorcycle test to driving her Harley up craggy trails with blind curves, this woman truly reinvents herself. Cheryl Strayed similarly challenged herself to backpack the Pacific Crest Trail without previous experience or someone to watch over her in case of tragedy. 

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Geralyn Technical Services

 

Permission to parent : how to raise your child with love and limits

Friday, June 5, 2015
Robin Berman, MD.
Permission to parent : how to raise your child with love and limits

Read this book on how to explore effective parenting through Love, Limits and Time.  Dr. Berman draws from her clinical experience as a psychiatrist, mother, her colleagues, accomplished teachers and role model parents to guide, inspire and teach us to be the best parents possible. “Loving your child is an instinct. Good parenting is a teachable skill.” Harvey Karp M.D.  This book is a real gift!      Check our Catalog

Kate D., Youth Services

Ashley's war : the untold story of a team of women soldiers on the Special Ops battlefield

Friday, June 5, 2015
Gayle Tzemach Lemmon
Ashley's war : the untold story of a team of women soldiers on the Special Ops b

I'm interested in the women in the military and this book was exceptional. The reader gets to know the women well, their applications for the military, their training and the actual work they were doing with the Afghan women and children.  As men soldiers were not allowed near the women, Ashley and her teammates were able to get a lot of pertinent information as to what was going on with the insurgents and terrorists.  It was dangerous and very hard and these women are heroes. It was a difficult reading but a worthwhile one. Check our Catalog

Sue N., Youth Services

Unbroken : a World War II story of survival, resilience, and redemption

Wednesday, May 27, 2015
Laura Hillenbrand
Unbroken : a World War II story of survival, resilience, and redemption

About the book:

On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane’s bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.

 

The lieutenant’s name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he’d been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown.

 

Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

 

My review:

This is an excellent book that is well worth the read.  Check our Catalog

Tania K., Circulation

 

Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed America

Friday, May 22, 2015
Erik Larson
Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair that Changed Ame

This book is in the 364 true crime section of the library but it reads like fiction and you forget it is non fiction.  The White City is the 1893 World's Fair in Chicago.  A serial killer lures women to the fair and a lot of the book is about him. Also we read about Chicago in the late 1800s and the poliltics involved in building the fair, and the opening of it.   There is so much history and it is told so well that it is hard to put down even though is is a very long book.  Check our Catalog

Sue N., Youth Services

The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the Plant Kingdom and Shaped Human History

Monday, May 18, 2015
Thor Hanson
The Triumph of Seeds: How Grains, Nuts, Kernels, Pulses, and Pips Conquered the

My initial thought on this book "How interesting can a book about seeds be?"  The author's writing style changed my mind, he makes seeds interesting with his story telling and conversation. The author creates interest with his conversational writing style and humor. Through the author's stories I learned a great deal of information about seeds and human history.  I learned new ways of seeing how something as small as a seed can cause great change in the world.  This is definitely a book to read whether you enjoy gardening or not. Check our Catalog

Jeremy E., Administration

Lethal Passage: The Story of a Gun

Friday, May 8, 2015
Erik Larson
Lethal Passage: The Story of a Gun

How the travels of a single handgun expose the roots of America's gun crisis.

This is a compelling and frightening book beginning with a 16 year old boy in Virginia shooting teachers and students in his school.

Larson studies our gun culture, the NRA, gun dealers, firearm manufacturers, and what is happening in our country today. A fascinating read!

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Sue N. Youth Services

Small-space vegetable gardens : growing great edibles in containers, raised beds, and small plots

Friday, May 1, 2015
Andrea Bellamy
Small-space vegetable gardens : growing great edibles in containers, raised beds

A great book for any gardener. Learn how to assess your space and plan your garden. There is also advise on pest control, pruning, harvesting, and a whole section on edibles that are suited for small spaces. So whether you have a balcony, patio, or small yard this book will inspire you to start that garden of your dreams. Check our Catalog

Jan H. Technical Services

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