Nonfiction

Seinfeldia

Wednesday, September 21, 2016
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
Seinfeldia

How a Show about Nothing Changed Everything

 

As an avid fan of Seinfeld, I was happy to discover this book. It is a detailed accounting of the creation of the show, as well as a behind-the-scenes story of the making of it. Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David went out for coffee and dreamed up the show, not really thinking that it would get very far. An NBC executive took a chance and ordered up four whole episodes to be broadcast in the summer of 1989 when not many people were watching anyway. It didn’t have a lot of viewers, but the critics liked it, so they ordered another half season to start in January the following year. It built from there, with more and more people watching “a show about nothing,” which was really about everything. Seinfeld and David drew stories from their everyday lives, mundane events that were made watchable because of the universal themes that everyone could relate to, such as waiting forever for a table at a restaurant, picking up dry cleaning, or returning an overdue library book--all the myriad boring details of life. The writers were instructed to write stories based on actual events in their lives, not to write like a normal sitcom. They would only be on staff for a year or two, because they would run out of material! All in all, a good read about a show that still resonates because of the timeless quality of the stories, and the great ensemble acting of Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer.  

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Pat P., Technical Services

The Age Fix

Saturday, September 17, 2016
Anthony Youn, MD
The Age Fix

We all would like to look younger, right? In this book, Dr. Youn gives you his advice on what works and what doesn't. He gives brand name suggestions on what to use. Some are under $20.00. If you're looking for more radiant and youthful looking skin, check out this book!

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Jan H., Technical Services

Duct Tape Parenting

Tuesday, September 6, 2016
Vicki Hoefle
Duct Tape Parenting

A Less is More Approach to Raising Respectful, Responsible, and Resilient Kids

 

This book has passed through my hands a couple of times, and even though my children are now young adults, I felt compelled to read it. It helped me to recognize my own parenting hang-ups like micromanaging, doing it myself so it's done "right", and bailing them out instead of letting them make their own mistakes and deal with the natural consequences. This is how you raise children who don't feel entitled to everything. I love the commonsense approach.

The focus of this book is to stop helicopter parenting, and to encourage parents to take a step back and allow children to learn from life lessons. Vicki Hoefle states that, "Duct Tape Parenting is a hands-off approach to parenting with a focus on developing and deepening the relationship between parents and kids without anyone feeling like a doormat or a dictator." She believes that the behaviors which get the most attention will continue to grow, whereas the behaviors that are ignored will fade away. Childhood is for learning and, through practice, kids learn skills for the real world. They also develop a sense of worth and self-confidence when their parents don’t cater to their every move.

There’s a new set of 3Rs for our kids—respect, responsibility, and resilience—to better prepare them for life in the real world. Once developed, these skills let kids take charge and let parents step back, to the benefit of all. Casting hover mothers and helicopter parents aside, Vicki Hoefle encourages a different, counterintuitive—yet much more effective—approach: for parents to sit on their hands, stay on the sidelines, even if duct tape is required, so that the kids step up. Duct Tape Parenting gives parents a new perspective on what it means to be effective, engaged parents and to enable kids to develop confidence through solving their own problems. This is not a book about the parenting strategy of the day—what the author calls "Post-It Note Parenting"—but rather a relationship-based guide to span all ages and stages of development. Witty, straight-shooting Hoefle addresses frustrated parents everywhere who are ready to raise confident, capable children to go out in the world.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Marybeth K., Circulation

The Last True Story I’ll Ever Tell

Thursday, August 25, 2016
John Crawford
The Last True Story I’ll Ever Tell

An Accidental Soldier's Account of the War in Iraq

 

I went to university with guys that were paying for school by playing soldier a couple weekends a month. They loved it. Loved the weekends. Loved getting out of school debt free. Then we went to war and the government changed the deal. The National Guard was transformed into an active duty arm of the military. Reading John Crawford’s story hit home.

He tells the story of our Guardsmen who did not sign up to go to war. They were kept for longer tours than some of their career counterparts. They were not as well equipped nor supported. He tells a painful story from the point of view of a young soldier, not from a journalistic or political perspective. It is enlightening and informative.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Cindy A., Circulation

 

Skin Cleanse

Tuesday, August 16, 2016
Adina Grigore
Skin Cleanse

The Simple, All-Natural Program for Clear, Calm, Happy Skin

 

"If you're like most women, you've been on a never-ending quest for perfect skin—or even just good skin—since adolescence. It's a frustrating pursuit to say the least, filled with one disappointing (and expensive) miracle solution after another. Why is it so hard to get good skin? Adina Grigore, founder of the organic skincare line S.W. Basics, would argue that getting clear, calm, happy skin is about much more than products and peels. Or, rather, it's about much less. In Skin Cleanse, she guides readers through a holistic program designed to heal skin from the inside out."

This book is informative and I especially like the chapters that include natural DIY skin care recipes.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Tania K., Circulation

 

Patterns in Nature: Why the Natural World Looks the Way It Does

Wednesday, August 3, 2016
Philip Ball
Patterns in Nature: Why the Natural World Looks the Way It Does

 

It was interesting to think how the diversity and complexity of nature could be thought of as similar patterns.  After reading a couple chapters I felt I was getting more out of looking at the beautiful pictures showing the patterns.  I would recommend this book for the pictures alone.

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Jeremy E., Administration

Waiting for the Morning Train

Monday, August 1, 2016
Bruce Catton
Waiting for the Morning Train

An American Boyhood

 

Anyone interested in Michigan history, or Americana for that matter, should check out this memoir by Civil War historian Bruce Catton. He writes about his boyhood in Benzonia, Michigan, in the early twentieth century. Unlike other northern Michigan towns, Benzonia was not a lumbering town. It was a Christian community that supported a preparatory academy for young people, which Catton attended and was headed by his father. I really enjoyed Catton’s stories about the academy: his playing in a band, a near tragedy ice surfing on Crystal Lake, and the long train and boat trips to visit relatives. Throughout, he weaves in Michigan and world history and observes the effects of technology on both. I think a lot of readers, like me, can relate to Catton’s boyhood and his philosophical take on change.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Doris M., Reference

 

I Quit Sugar

Saturday, June 25, 2016
Sara Wilson
I Quit Sugar

Your Complete 8-Week Detox Program and Cookbook

 

From the book cover:

“Sarah Wilson thought of herself as a relatively healthy eater. She didn’t realize how much sugar was hidden in her diet, or how much it was affecting her well-being. When she learned that her sugar consumption could be the source of a lifetime of mood swings, fluctuating weight, sleep problems, and thyroid disease, she knew she had to make a change.

What started as an experiment to eliminate sugar--both the obvious and the hidden kinds--soon became a way of life, and now Sarah shows you how you can quit sugar too.”

 

I like this book. Cutting back on sugar (fructose) and getting back into clean eating habits has been on my agenda lately. This book was a good kickstart for me. It has some of useful tips, information, and recipes.

Check our catalog for this book.

 

Tania K., Circulation

The Sleep Revolution

Tuesday, June 14, 2016
Arianna Huffington
The Sleep Revolution: Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time

Transforming Your Life, One Night at a Time

This was an interesting read about the importance of sleep. Lack of sleep risks include heart attack, stroke, diabetes and obesity as well as problems on the job and in our relationships. The author, co-founder and editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post, offers some possible help to getting more sleep including the familiar--put aside the electronic devices, exercise more, and meditate--but some less so, including suggestions on how to use the latest sleep-tracking devices and sleep-optimizing hotels. Also included are some actual meditations in the back. Our library owns the physical book plus it is available through to download on your mobile device as an ebook as well as an audiobook. I plan to listen to the meditations on the audiobook when it becomes available.

 

Interested in reading this book? Check our catalog.

Want to download the ebook or audio to your iPad, Kindle, or other mobile device using Overdrive? Find the ebook and the audiobook on the MCLS site. You will need your library card number and PIN to access it.

(Need help downloading and using ebooks and digital audiobooks from the library? Visit the Reference Desk or Book a Librarian!)

 

Betsy H., Reference

Lorena Garcia's New Taco Classics

Monday, June 13, 2016
Lorena Garcia with Liz Balmaseda
Lorena Garcia's New Taco Classics

This is one of the best cookbooks I’ve seen recently, and I read a lot of cookbooks. If your family enjoys Mexican food, you might want to peruse this in a shady nook somewhere, preferably while sipping a margarita! Most, but not all, of the recipes have a fairly short list of ingredients. The sauces, slaws, salads, breads, and condiments look surprisingly simple. The pictures are bright, beautiful, and will get your appetite going. The few recipes that call for multiple steps and sub-recipes are the tacos and meat dishes, which include the meat recipe itself and the recipes for sauces, salsas, and slaws to accompany it. If you’re short on time, simply substitute store-bought items such as salsa, sauce, or tortillas. My personal favorite chapters are the breads and slaws.

Check out this cookbook in a catalog and grab your margarita fixings!

 

Laura P., Circulation

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