Nonfiction

7 Steps to Raising a Bilingual Child

Thursday, July 29, 2010
Naomi Steiner, M.D.

My husband and I have struggled over the years with the idea of raising our children to be bilingual. 7 Steps to Raising a Bilingual Child is very practical in addressing many concerns. The book is laid out in an orderly fashion and has a nice variety of examples of real life situations where families have dealt with raising a child to be bilingual. It has an entire section devoted to creating an action plan and another one devoted to predictable obstacles. This is an excellent resource for families where one parent speaks a language other than English as a mother tongue. If you are trying to decide if and how to pass that language and heritage on to your child read this book. It concludes with a resource list which I promptly took advantage of by going back to the library collection and borrowing language CD's and a CD-Rom for my children.

Cindy A., Circulation

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When Evil Came to Good Hart

Thursday, July 29, 2010
Mardi Link
Seven year old Mardi Link was in the back seat of the family Ford, on her way to a relative's cottage, when WJR interrupted a ballgame to break news of the grisly discovery. Link is the author of the first nonfiction account of the murders. 'I guess I was struck by the fact that Susie and I were the same age,' Link says. 'I was always intrigued by the case. Who would kill an entire family? And why?' Police asked those same questions.

Link's look at the case is a great example of how a mystery, when well presented, can be even more compelling than one that's been solved. In digging through evidence, reading numerous newspaper accounts from that time, and talking to a score of Good Hart residents, Link explores more than just the Robison case. In presenting the facts, she asks questions about the nature of evil, and comments on loss of innocence in many ways, her own, the town's, the era's. Her descriptions vary from melodic and wistful to hard-hitting, a combination that keeps the pages turning fast.

For the Robisons, she writes, it was to be their first full summer in Good Hart, a result of business success: "It was a simple but enduring dream, shared by thousands of Michigan families, but one that for the Robisons this summer in 1968, lasted just eight days."

Diane, Administration

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The Great Reset: How New Ways of Living and Working Drive Post-Crash Prosperity

Thursday, July 29, 2010
Richard Florida

The Great Reset presents an interesting, sometimes fascinating, framing of our current economic situation or crisis. Florida sets the stage by looking back at two time periods, the Long Recession of the 1870’s and the Great Depression of the 1930’s, both which have striking similarities with the present. Florida’s argument is that we aren’t in a “crisis” but a “reset”. A “reset” isn’t limited to just the economy, but reaches out broadly across social order and geography. For me, The Great Reset helped put things in perspective, especially the historical comparisons. Florida also looks forward, not with crystal ball clarity, about what changes we need to make as we progress through this reset to a new social and economic framework. Richard Florida, director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management, is the author of The Rise of the Creative Class and Who’s Your City. His work is referenced in the MI Prosperity Initiative and the New Economy training presented by the Land and Policy Institute, MSU. This is not a textbook filled with technical jargon; it is totally accessable and easy to read.

Holly, Youth Services

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Strength Training for Women

Thursday, July 29, 2010
Joan Pagano
Strength Training for Women

This is a comprehensive, step-by-step guide to strength training for women, showing techniques to help tone muscle, burn fat, and defy the ageing process. It is a resource for women of all ages looking to improve their overall health. An anatomy chart that depicts the major muscle groups and the exercises that are best suited to them is included. Exercises are labeled as beginner, intermediate or advanced level. Many of Pagnano's beginner exercises require no special equipment, relying instead on everyday fixtures like chairs, walls and kitchen countertops. Other exercises use free weights, stretch bands and stability balls. The color photos, diagrams and clear explanations make the exercises easy to follow, and Pagano provides full training programs for improving posture and strengthening the lower, upper and core muscles of the body. This book may be one of the best substitutes for pricey gym memberships and personal trainers. After reading through this book I have ordered a copy for myself and hope if I have it always available at home I will use it at least occasionally.

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Betsy H., Reference

 

The Parrot Who Thought She Was a Dog

Thursday, July 29, 2010
Nancy Ellis-Bell
The Parrot Who Thought She Was a Dog
A most interesting saga of an orphaned parrot that was adopted by a woman and all the fun trial and tribulations they go through before the parrot “adopts” her. The family is turned upside down by this "potty mouthed, one footed, blue and gold macaw." Super book!
 
Marilyn S., Circulation

Gold Medal Fitness

Thursday, July 22, 2010
Dara Torres

When Gold Medal Fitness came across the circulation desk as a recently returned item I caught a glimpse of the cover and initially thought, “Here’s another “quick fix” fitness book.” But, I took a second to identify the woman on the front. Dara Torres is one of the most celebrated swimmers of all time and at the age of 42, competes with girls half her age. Now intrigued to find out what she is promoting, I tossed her latest title into my bookbag as a potential vacation read.


Once settled into my beach chair overlooking Deep Lake at our family’s cabin in Northern Michigan I picked up Gold Medal Fitness and skimmed the entire book in one sitting. Dara’s inspirational writing gives those interested in fine tuning their fitness an excellent nutrition plan to prepare your body for the stretching and strengthening exercises she used to transform her body. She also incorporates ways to enjoy cardiovascular activities and why rest and recovery are so important for your body in any sports training plan. I look forward to integrating some of the concepts that Dara touches on and also working through her stretching exercise to help improve my physical health.

Emily D., Circulation

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Design Your Natural Midwest Garden

Thursday, July 22, 2010
Patricia Hill

I love colorful gardens.  I hate cutting the grass.  I want a garden to be beautiful from spring to summer.  I don’t want to spend time and resources endlessly watering my garden.  I believe that compost is better than chemical fertilizers.  I believe that native plants, and lots of them, are the way to garden.  If your gardening philosophy matches mine, or you just like gardening books with great pictures, time spent with this title will be time well spent.  I’m currently plotting and planning to turn a lot of my grass into gardens.

Holly, Youth Services

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Thursday, July 22, 2010
Rebecca Skloot

In 1951,Henrietta Lacks died of cervical cancer, but in 2010 her cells live on. Before she died, doctors removed cancer cells from Lacks and those cells were successfully reproduced. The cells were then sold to scientists and researchers throughout the world. Over time the HeLa cells were used in developing a polio vaccine; uncovered secrets of cancer, viruses and the effects of the atom bomb; helped lead to important advances like in vitro fertilization, cloning and gene mapping; and have been bought and sold by the billions, according to Skloot.



In the past few decades a handful of articles have been written about Henrietta Lacks, but Skloot is the first person to delve deeper into the story of the woman and her surviving family members. In researching her book, Skloot a gifted writer and researcher, learned that Lacks’ family knew very little about the cells and how they have been used.



While the subject matter may seem intimidating, Skloot skillfully breaks down difficult concepts. She includes details that make readers feel as though they are riding along with her as she conducts her interviews and earns the trust of Lacks’ sons and daughter.



Her quest to learn about Lacks makes a compelling story.  Don’t be put off by the scientific subject matter, this is no dry science book read. You’ll be cheering Skloot on as you turn page after page.



Cyndi L., Reference

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The Guardian Building, Cathedral of Finance

Thursday, July 22, 2010
James W. Tottis

As I was browsing in the new books in the East Wing, I discovered "The Guardian Building, Cathedral of Finance" by James W. Tottis.   It is an art book with the call number 720.977.   I like Detroit and enjoy going there and am anxious to go and check out the Guardian Building.   The book has great photos and tells a lot of the history of downtown as well as the building itself.  The book includes art, architecture, history and more.



Sue N., Youth Services

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Waiting on a Train

Thursday, July 22, 2010
James McCommons

The author delivers a passionate defense of the passenger rail service in the United States.  He details much of the history of AMTRAK and its bumpy ride of the last forty years.  Many of his arguments  for a better public transportation system are aimed at a greener America.  This was a joy to read.



Mary L., Reference

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