Nonfiction

Cheating Death: The Doctors and Medical Miracles that are Saving Lives Against All Odds

Thursday, August 19, 2010
Sanjay Gupta, M.D.
This book is fascinating! I read it almost 1 year ago, and I am still thinking about some of the things I learned from this book. I learned that chest compressions are more important than rescue breaths when giving CPR; that stopping the body functions with cold/ice can be a lifesaver; that people do in many cases, come back from comas; and that countries define death differently. I believe Gupta himself defines this book as a medical thriller, and I would have to agree with him. He weaves in stories of real life cases and situations to define the medical concepts which makes this book read like a novel. Available through MelCat.

Margaret, Reference

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Foot by Foot Through the U.S.A.

Thursday, August 19, 2010
Francis Line
Foot by Foot Through the U.S.A.

A High Adventure Odyssey to Every State in the Union

 

Written by two Howell High School grads in 1920, who left home on an adventure and literally walked America. I believe a brother is still living in his 90s. What a narrator and an adventure!

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Marilyn S., Circulation

 

The Promise: God's Purpose and Plan When Life Hurts

Thursday, August 12, 2010
Jonathon Morris

Why did I lose my job? Why did mom die? Why do I have cancer? Fr. Morris leads us on the path to healing  when things happen beyond our control and we are hurting.  Great read and great help!



Sharon D., Circulation

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The New Frugality: How to Consume Less, Save More and Live Better

Thursday, August 12, 2010
Chris Farrell

Chris Farrell is the Economics Editor of Marketplace Money and being the NPR junkie that I am, I had to take a look at his latest book.  The book contains many of the “rules” that you have heard before: pay yourself first, live within your means, save more, have a margin of safety, pay off your debt, avoid debt etc.  The difference is the way that Farrell predicts we will look at money and how we will use money.  Times have changed and our attitude and how we handle our money need to change as well.  Being green is a money matter.  Is homeownership really the way to go?  How the idea of “retirement” is changing.   How much money will one need for retirement? Some common sense investing tips including a reality check.  Finally how generosity and gratitude are part of being frugal.  I found that the discussion about what “retirement” has meant over the course of time and Farrell’s suggestions about what it will be for us gave me a lot to think about.



Holly, Youth Services

**This book is only available through MelCat Interlibrary Loan

 

Buffalo for the Broken Heart: Restoring Life to a Black Hills Ranch

Thursday, August 12, 2010
Dan O'Brien

Dan wanted to live a noble life, one true to his beliefs, and he found it on the wind-swept prarie of the Black Hills.  O'Brien gives you a glimpse into ranch life and doesn't shy away from the financial hardships that it brings.  He has a fierce love of the land and displays it in every page.  His beautiful writing brings the Western Great Plains to life whether he's describing the habits of the buffalo, how falcons hunt, or how the grasslands can be restored.   Read every page and loved it!



Margaret, Reference

**This book in only available through MelCat interlibrary loan

Generation T: 108 Ways to Transform a T-shirt

Thursday, August 12, 2010
Megan Nicolay

If you’re looking for a fun thing to do to end your summer, then look no farther than Megan Nicolay’s book; Generation T. This unique, totally chic book will instruct you on how to transform old, unwanted t-shirts into totally new, stylish ones. It will teach you how to slash, cut, sew, and tie your t-shirts into practically anything; including a wedding dress. I had tons of old t-shirts laying around and I had so much fun with them using this book. You don’t even need any crafting experience; all of the projects are rated from easy to hard.



Laura W., Circulation

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Bad Mother: a Chronicle of Maternal Crimes, Minor Calamities and Occasional Moments of Grace

Thursday, August 12, 2010
Ayelet Waldman

Author Ayelet Waldman raised the ire of mothers across America, when the The New York Times published an essay of hers in 2005, called "Truly, Madly, Guiltily" where she said that she loves her husband more than her children see http://www.nytimes.com/2005/03/27/fashion/27love.html
 
With Bad Mother, Waldman who is married to the writer Michael Chabon, explores many other topics sure to get tempers flaring at the next playgroup get together, or at least spur a healthy discussion of all that is expected of mothers in this century.  Competitive parenting, the "bad mother" police and balancing the work-family dyanamic are just a few of the ideas she explores. I especially liked an essay called "Drawing a Line" where she found a way to help her third grader who was drowning in homework each night.

I also found it interesting to read these essays because of the perspective Waldman offers. She lives in Berkeley, California which seems like a world away from Livingston County.



I enjoy Waldman's essays because when I read them I feel a little like I've just met a smart, funny girlfriend for coffee. We all need that kind of coffee break once in a while.



Cyndi L., Reference

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Just Listen

Friday, August 6, 2010
Mark Goulston

This book is good for just about anyone.  Have a teenager?  Have a difficult boss, employee, client, family member, spouse, neighbor?   The author helps reshift a pattern of dealing with situations.  Instead of getting more emotional and trying to persuade, encourage, argue, and push the author encourages the reader to listen, breathe, ask, echo what you've heard.  One of the first chapters was very informative regarding how our brain reacts to situations.  It talks about our fight or flight response and how our rational brain basically gets hijacked.

It also describes many situations where we think we are listening and encourages us to listen differently so we can really hear what is going on with the other person.  Sometimes we get stuck on the words we hear and not what is behind the words.

This is a great tool.  It is an easy read, but you are going to want to read slowly to soak it in.  Again, one of those books you'll read a few times to master some of the skills.

Cindy A., Circulation

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The Teeth May Smile But The Heart Does Not Forget

Friday, August 6, 2010
Andrew Rice

This is an elegantly written story.  The book shares the detailed history and pain in Uganda from years of brutal dictatorships and civil wars.  The topic is overwhelming emotionally and intellectually.  Journalist, Andrew Rice, makes it accessable by writing about one man's story. The book reads like a murder mystery.  Duncan Laki, almost 30 years after the disappearance of his father seeks justice.  Throughout the book we see how the Ugandan people  must deal with their history of civil war and the brutality that came with it.  "Public sentiment was complex-people were fatigued, people wanted the wars to end, people were wary of courtroom confrontations-but the decisive factor, according to Ugandans themselves, was a simple desire to forgive.  Reconcilation is an integral concept in African culture."  
 
Ar the end, you will have a detailed knowledge of Ugandan history.  But, what you will be left with is the haunting in your heart of what it means to forgive, to forget.
 
Cindy A., Circulation

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Friday, August 6, 2010
Rebecca Skloot

This book is nonfiction, but reads more like a story.  It documents the life of a woman named Henrietta Lacks, who in 1951 was a victim of an aggressive case of cervical cancer.  The book delves into her challenges as a black woman from a poor family getting medical care during the times of segregation.  She was treated at Johns Hopkins by leading doctors who determined that the cells from her tumor tissue could be cultured and grown in a way never seen before. Ultimately her cells, call HeLa (first two letters of her name, Henrietta Lacks) were used extensively through history for medical research and became the basis for developing the cure for polio; research and treatments for cancer, bacterial and viral infections and more.   Meanwhile, Henrietta’s family knew nothing of how her cells were being used.



The author’s decade-long research of Henrietta’s family and medical situation is blended with details of scientific research.   The author discusses the ethical impact Henrietta’s case had on the medical world. The book provides a good background on the development of informed consent and provokes thought of our rights on the use of human tissues for the future.



Donna L., Administration

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