Nonfiction

Reimaging Detroit: Opportunities for Redefining an American City

Friday, June 17, 2011
John Gallagher
I was born in Detroit, as were both my parents and my son, and raised in a northern suburb (Romeo which is in Macomb County). I went to college in Detroit, I've worked in Detroit, I've played in Detroit, I met my husband in Detroit, I was married in Detroit, I have friends who live in Detroit. Detroit is part of who I am. Detroit also breaks my heart. I see a shell of what was a great city. I still believe in Detroit and I believe that for Michigan to survive, Detroit must survive. John Gallagher's book gives a history lesson about how Detroit grew, peaked and fell. This isn't just about the "auto industry", but urban development Gallagher's book aslo give hope highlighting positive changes taking place in Detroit and a few senerios that will lead the city to a rebirth. Gallagher is a veteran journalist who writes about urban and economic development for the Detroit Free Press. This is a 2011 Michigan Notable Book.
 
Holly, Youth Services
 
 

Stroke-free for Life

Friday, June 17, 2011
David Wieberes, M.D
Having just had a stroke in May, I really wanted to study up on strokes, the symptoms, prevention and treatment. I learned a lot and will refer to this book periodically. It is a really good book for anyone to read.

Sue N., Youth Services
 
 
 

7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis (Audio Book on CD)

Monday, November 8, 2010
Bill George
Former CEO of Medtronics and a professor at Harvard Business School Bill George gives 7 short lessons on leading in a crisis:  1) Face Reality, Starting With Yourself; 2) No Matter How Bad Things Are, They Will Get Worse; 3) Build a Mountain of Cash and Get to the Highest Hill; 4) Never Waste a Good Crisis; 5) Before Asking Others to Sacrifice, Volunteer Yourself; 6) Don't Be Atlas: Get the World Off Your Shoulders! 7) Be Aggressive: This is Your Best Chance to Win in the Market.

Kathleen Z., Library Director

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The Happiness Project: Or Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun

Thursday, September 30, 2010
Gretchen Rubin

About a month ago I finished reading The Happiness Project and I don't think a day has passed where I haven't thought about it at least once. What I most enjoyed about this book is learning about Rubin's Twelve Personal Commandments which include things like "Act the way I want to feel," "Do it Now" and "There is only Love." In addition to trying to live by her personal commandments, Rubin undertakes various themes for each month of the year attempting to live out several principals she has set for herself. For instance, for January her goal is "Vitality" so she undertakes activities designed to boost energy.

Rubin explains her goals for the month and then tells her readers how she did with accomplishing that goal. Like all of us sometimes she would meet her goals, others she'd miss them. What I admire about the book is Rubin's candor. We all make mistakes. Rubin owns up to hers with all of us reading.

I could relate to her stories of getting impatient with her husband or frustrated by something her daughter had done. What's most important, it seems it to keep trying. Some things will work,others might not, but through it all, she is still growing and learning every day.

In the end, this is a book about happiness and one woman's quest to find it. In the process she helps all who read it discover what makes them happy.

Cyndi L., Reference

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In Defense of Food: An Eater's Manifesto

Thursday, September 30, 2010
Michael Pollan
Pollan is the author of The Omnivore's Dilemma.  "Eat food.  Not too much.  Mostly plants.," is his advice.  This short book help explain why the Western diet that reduces food to bite-size nutrients has produced a large group of people who are over-fed and under-nourished.  His inspiring research gives good guidance to help us put our food "back together" to enjoy eating well and being healthy.

Kathleen Z., Library Director

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Change Your Brain, Change Your Body: Use Your Brain to Get and Keep the Body You Have Always Wanted

Thursday, September 30, 2010
Daniel G. Amen, M.D.
Change Your Brain, Change Your Body

The key to a better body is a healthy brain. Based on the latest medical research, as well as on Dr. Amen’s two decades of clinical practice, Change Your Brain, Change Your Body shows you how to take the very best care of your brain. Some of the things I learned or were reinforced are ways to reach and maintain my ideal weight, how to sharpen my memory, how to avoid depression and how to increase my willpower. This is easily readable and you can skip around in the book and still get lots of hints to make your life better.

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Betsy H., Reference

 

 

This Year I Will

Thursday, September 30, 2010
M.J. Ryan

It's getting close to back to school time and I think for many people that means taking stock and getting back into a routine. While this book was written with those who make New Year's resolutions in mind, I think it has value for anyone looking to change a habit and stick with it at any time of the year.



Ryan has great advice on why we fail to keep resolutions and tips for making resolutions that are concrete. She offers examples of what has worked for herself, her family members and her clients.



What I liked most about her book is that Ryan offers many examples and options, but encourages people to try them out and keep only the solutions that are right for them. For example, she said some people are motivated by rewards, others are not.  This book is sure to help anyone who'd like to make a change and looking for some insight on how to do just that.

Cyndi L., Reference

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Clara's War, One Girl's Story of Survival

Thursday, September 30, 2010
Clara Kramer

This is a gripping story, similar to Anne Frank's Diary, about survival in Poland during WWII.  Eighteen people lived in a bunker under a house and were allowed up at various times to help clean the house and breathe fresh air.  At times, soldiers and Nazis also lived upstairs and the families could not mover for hours or days.  The book goes into much more detail about what was going on outside and with the progression of the war than does Frank's book. Mr. Beck, an alcoholic, womanizer and anti-Semite, steps up and saves almost all of the people.  You really feel the torture and fear that the families go through during this trying time.



Sue N., Youth Services

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Cheating Death: The Doctors and Medical Miracles that are Saving Lives Against All Odds

Thursday, August 19, 2010
Sanjay Gupta, M.D.
This book is fascinating! I read it almost 1 year ago, and I am still thinking about some of the things I learned from this book. I learned that chest compressions are more important than rescue breaths when giving CPR; that stopping the body functions with cold/ice can be a lifesaver; that people do in many cases, come back from comas; and that countries define death differently. I believe Gupta himself defines this book as a medical thriller, and I would have to agree with him. He weaves in stories of real life cases and situations to define the medical concepts which makes this book read like a novel. Available through MelCat.

Margaret, Reference

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Foot by Foot Through the U.S.A.

Thursday, August 19, 2010
Francis Line
Foot by Foot Through the U.S.A.

A High Adventure Odyssey to Every State in the Union

 

Written by two Howell High School grads in 1920, who left home on an adventure and literally walked America. I believe a brother is still living in his 90s. What a narrator and an adventure!

Check the catalog for this book.

Marilyn S., Circulation

 

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