Nonfiction

Animals Make Us Human

Friday, August 12, 2011
Temple Grandin (audiobook)

I listened to 7 out of 10 disks of this book on a trip last week. It was written by an author who has autism and is about insight into animal feelings and emotions. Fascinating authenticated studies and information about the best life for animals and what we should be doing for them. There are sections on dogs, cats, horses, cattle and pigs. My animal lover daughter found it much more interesting than I did but it was worth while listening to.

Sue N., Youth Services

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Semper Cool, One Marine's Fond Memories of Vietnam

Thursday, July 28, 2011
Barry Fixler
I’ve always been interested in the war in Vietnam and this book is told from the view of an 18 year old boy who joins the Marines. Some of the things in the book are funny but of course a lot of it is tragic. I can't imagine how these young men survived this experience. And a lot of Fixler's friends and fellow soldiers did not. The book also tells about coming home and how that worked out. Very interesting history book.
 
Sue N., Youth Services
 

A Secret Gift

Friday, July 22, 2011
Ted Gup

I read about this book in the newspaper and had to get it from MelCat. Ted Gup got an old suitcase when his grandfather died. In 1933, Sam Stone was doing better with finances so he offered to give 75 people some money to help them through the Great Depression. They had to write letters describing their lives and why they were deserving. He gave $5 to each of these people and in 1933 that was a lot of money. People bought food, clothing, paid their rent, etc. The book presents some of these letters which really show how life was during the Great Depression. It is a gripping book and most appreciated by older people who have lived during those years or who remember their families talking about it. I think my generation (older!) can see how it affected our lives and how we live them.

Sue N., Youth Services
 
 

Your Bones: how you can prevent osteoporosis and have strong bones for life-naturally

Friday, July 22, 2011
Lara Pizzorono

This book has a lot of information on vitamin supplements, exercise, and other helpful ways to help your bones. I was distressed about the information concerning Boniva and Fosamax since I do take Boniva. It made me doubt whether I was doing the right thing for my bones. So I am taking this information but not necessarily using it. Interesting book though.

Sue N., Youth Services

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Mindless Eating

Thursday, June 30, 2011
Brian Wansink
Fascinating book- I hope I can use some of the ideas it has for curbing just eating when I really don't need to.  The book talks about serving sizes, purchasing store brands instead of big name brands, and a great chapter on fast foods and the media.  Wansink says we can shave off 10 or 20 pounds a year by following these ideas, hmmm.  Look for me a year from now and we'll see!

Sue N., Youth Services

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Pink Boots and a Machete: My Journey from NFL Cheerleader to National Geographic Explorer

Thursday, June 30, 2011
Mireya Mayor
This book has chapters on different areas where Mayor did exploring.  She worked in gorilla areas, the Masai Mara in Kenya, followed Dr. Livingstone's trail, and searched for small animals about to become extinct.  She usually was the only woman on these journeys and suffered a lot of hardships as well as dangerous situations.  Each chapter was different so it is a pick up and put down sort of book.  As travel and adventure it really is an interesting book.
 
Sue N., Youth Services
 

UNBROKEN, A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Laura Hillenbrand

All I can say is 'wow' about this book. Louis Zamperini would probably have made the first 4 minute mile in the Olympics but was drafted into the army. The first part of the book is about his wild childhood and teen years and how running turned him around. Then during WW II his plane crashed and he was on a raft for about 50 days, shot at by the Japanese, then captured by them and was a POW. I was horrified to read what the Japanese soldiers did to the POWs. Then the book continues with his release after the war and coming home and life after the war. The book is long and detailed with 50 pages of documentation so is a true history. I couldn't put it down, read it in 48 hours (didn't do much else). Zamperini was an amazing man and even more amazing is how he survived all of this and lived to tell about it.

Sue N.,Youth Services
 
 
 

My Stroke of Insight, A Brain Scientist's Personal Journey

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Jill Bolte Taylor, Ph.D.

This book was recommended by 2 other staff members, Holly and Diane. Having just had a stroke (and fortunately not having any repercussions from it) I was interested in reading this book. The first few chapters were quite heavy and scientific about the workings of the brain. Then she talks about her stroke and the 8 years it took for her to completely recover.  But the fascinating thing about the book was the last few chapters about the left and right mind, how to accept the way we think and peace of mind. One of the best sentences was: "When I am simply grateful, life is simply great."  This book is really worth reading.

Sue N, Youth Services

Beat the Gym

Thursday, June 23, 2011
Tom Holland

If you are interested in joining a gym this book is a must read. Tom Holland walks you through what to look for, what questions to ask, gym etiquette, how to use the different machines and my favorite part –what to do when you get there. He gives great examples of exercise routines and motivates you just like a personal trainer would. A great book for those interested in joining a gym and even the lifelong gym member.

Jan H, Technical Services

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Stroke-free for Life

Friday, June 17, 2011
David Wieberes, M.D
Having just had a stroke in May, I really wanted to study up on strokes, the symptoms, prevention and treatment. I learned a lot and will refer to this book periodically. It is a really good book for anyone to read.

Sue N., Youth Services
 
 
 

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