Nonfiction

A 1000-mile walk on the beach: one woman’s trek of the perimeter of Lake Michigan

Friday, December 16, 2011
Loreen Niewenhuis
A 1000-mile walk on the beach

I thoroughly enjoyed reading about Loreen’s  1,019 mile Lake Trek around Lake Michigan. She started walking from Navy Pier, Chicago in March of 2009. It took her 64 days (not continuously), walking an average of 16 miles a day to finish in September 2009. Her longest daily trek was 25 miles and her shortest was 5 miles, because at times she had to walk against the wind and over boulders that acted as retaining walls. An excerpt from her book explained her feelings. “I was becoming attuned to the rhythms of the lake, the connections of rivers and streams to the big body of water, sensitized to the flow of air over waves. I was also connecting to the shoreline, the undulations, the geology, the plants and wildlife. The shapes of the shoreline were meaningful; for instance, I knew a certain curve would allow a river to merge with the lake, while a larger curve would create a bay, creating a space that would calm the waters enough to allow more plant life to thrive.  I felt like I belonged, that I was part of the circle, that I was there to record the lake in my body with each stride." Would I take on such a feat? You betcha! Check our catalog

Geralyn, Technical Services

Lost Detroit: stories behind the Motor City's majestic ruins

Friday, December 16, 2011
Dan Austin
Lost Detroit

These "lost" buildings in Detroit still stand, or rather totter, in a dilapidated state, their histories fading like the paint on their walls.  But they echo back to a time when Detroiters lived, loved, toiled, played, celebrated and dreamed great dreams in these buildings and, thereby, helped shape a nation. Check our catalog

Holly, Youth Services

Old Man and the Swamp: a true story about my weird dad, a bunch of snakes & one ridiculous road trip.

Friday, December 16, 2011
John Sellers
Old Man and the Swamp

In an effort to reconnect with his father, John Sellers follows his father into the swampland of southern Michigan in search of threatened copperbelly water snake.  What follows is not your typical father/son memoir, but a hilarious, heartfelt quest of discovery . . . with snakes. Check our catalog

Diane, Administration 

Beyond the Body Farm: A Legendary Bone Detective Explores Murders, Mysteries, and the Revolution in Forensic Science

Wednesday, December 14, 2011
Dr. Bill Bass & Jon Jefferson
Beyond the body farm

Fans of forensic thrillers and mysteries and true crime will like this book that gives background on forensic science. Dr. Bass started the first "body farm" that gauges how and how fast bodies decompose when exposed to different conditions. At first bodies for the farm were scarce; now people gladly will their bodies to be skeletonized. That's fascinating, but what's really interesting are the cases the authors discuss. With each case they present, they tell a little more about forensic techniques and their development--and the comfort forensic specialists sometimes bring to families wondering what happened to a loved one.  Don't miss the chapter about the Big Bopper!  Check our catalog

Doris, Reference
 

The Complete Book of Bone Health

Wednesday, December 14, 2011
Diane L. Schneider, MD
Complete Book of Bone Health
This book has 426 pages of great iinformation on bone density scans, risk factors for bone loss, and medicines and supplements both good and bad. It is a 2011 book with many references so I feel it is reliable information.  Anyone with osteopenia will want to take a look at this book. I spent many hours with it and made copious notes.  Check our catalog
 
Sue N., Youth Services

Your Bones, how you can prevent osteoporosis and have strong bones for llife-naturally.

Wednesday, December 14, 2011
Lara Pizzorno
Your Bones
 
I am very concerned about osteoporosis and found this book informative and valuable. It answers a lot of questions and gives great suggestions for everyday things a person can do to help their bones. The book strongly opposes the 'Sally Field' drug, Boniva, which I have been taking. And it explains the reasons why the author and other reference sources oppose it.  This is a very current book, published in 2011 with many references for each chapter.  Check our catalog
 
Sue N., Youth Services

The Education of Henry Adams

Friday, December 2, 2011
Henry Adams
The Education of Henry Adams

Henry Adams is the definition of a prodigal son.  In his autobiography, he provides a unique account of 19th century American history.  As the grandson and great-grandson of two of the most celebrated American presidents, he struggles to find his own identity. Despite being written by an older hand, he preserves the cynicism and ambivalence of his younger days.  This biography is not the usual reiteration of historical bullet points found in textbooks, but a very personal journey through aristocracy and the political turmoil of his era.  There are more interesting chapters of his life than others, but his unique writing style impresses upon the reader that every small occasion provides an education.  Check our catalog

Nate, Reference

The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York

Friday, December 2, 2011
Deborah Blum
The Poisoner's Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age N

Blum is a Pulitzer Prize winner who makes chemistry real and fascinating in her tale of the careers of two important people in the field of forensic toxicology, Dr. Charles Norris, and Alexander Gettler.  The book follows the events in New York in the early 20th century.  Each chapter is named after a poison, and contains the unsettling real-life cases in which these two men devised methods to solve the crimes and detect the poisons.  Some parts are a little gruesome, and a little heavy on the chemistry, but a good read nonetheless.  Check our catalog for the audio book  or Check MelCat for the book

Margaret, Reference

Love at First Bark

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
Julie Klam
Love at First Bark

Writer Julie Klam goes to great lengths to help her four-legged friends. She lovingly welcomes an incontinent Boston terrier into her home, wiles away a hot summer day hanging out with an abandoned pit bull in New York City and spends much of what was supposed to be a vacation in New Orleans learning about rescue work there. Klam, a writer whose stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, O: The Oprah Magazine, Glamour and The New York Times, has got such a good heart and she’s tenacious. You’ll find lots of smart, funny writing, plenty of love and respect for animals and a little sadness in these stories of her life as a dog rescuer.

Reading this book made me feel like I was curled up and cozy with my favorite, cuddly pup. Listen to Klam’s description of sweet Clementine, who arrived after being shuffled around by several owners, “She was a stranger in a strange land, and it had to be so hard. I kissed the top of her head and she turned around and licked my cheek one time.” This book is sure to please dog lovers and anyone who likes a glimpse into life in the big city.  I also highly recommend her earlier book, “You Had Me at Woof.” 

Check our catalog for Love at First Bark: How Saving A Dog Can Sometimes Help You Save Your Life.

Check our catalog for You had me at woof : how dogs taught me the secrets of happiness  

Cyndi L., Reference

Killer Stuff and Tons of Money

Tuesday, November 22, 2011
Maureen Stanton
Killer Stuff and Tons of Money

A fascinating look at the antiques business by a very gifted writer.  This book is nonfiction but reads like a novel.   I love how the author interjects historical information into the story, so you get a history lesson as well as following an antique dealer through the trials and tribulations of the long hours spent at antique shows.  I was really interested in what this type of career was like and Maureen Stanton portrays it with great honesty and detail.  Check our catalog

Margaret, Reference

 

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