Nonfiction

The bookseller of Kabul

Friday, December 16, 2016
Asne Seierstad
The bookseller of Kabul
I love reading books about other worlds and cultures.  This one is extraordinary.  Seierstad was in Afghanistan with the military when she wandered into a bookshop in Kabul.  Intrigued with the owner she proposed joining his home to enable her to tell their story.  She writes with respect and graciousness of life, in particular, for women in a culture and religion most of us westerners know nothing about.  She is able to tell the story with little judgement, but lets it speak for itself and gives voice to what the various members of the family experience, think, and feel.
 

Cindy A., Circ.

Vietnam: A History of the War

Wednesday, November 23, 2016
Russell Freedman
Vietnam: A History of the War

I usually enjoy books by Russell Freedman and this one caught my eye. I was a child during the time of the Vietnam War: old enough to be aware of it, but too young to understand any of the politics behind it. The author did a great job of explaining the history of Vietnam and things that led up to the U.S. war in the country. Facts were presented in a clear and very readable manner. I learned a lot!

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Laura G., Youth Services

No Better Friend

Friday, November 18, 2016
Robert Weintraub
No Better Friend

The book is about "A Man, A Dog, and Their Incredible True Story of Friendship and Survival in WWII." The smarts and instincts of the dog, Judy, are amazing given the circumstances she was in. If you enjoy WWII books and/or dog stories, this is a book worth reading. The book is well written and is a quick read.

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Jeremy E., Administration

J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World Movie Magic

Monday, November 14, 2016
Jody Revenson
J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World Movie Magic

Volume 1: Extraordinary People and Fascinating Places

 

Are you a Potterhead of the first order? Did you come to our library’s Harry Potter Day this past Saturday, November 12, 2016? Are you ready to see more of J.K. Rowling’s Wizarding World in the upcoming new film, Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, opening this Friday? Then this book is for you!

In it, you'll get brief, fun look at the production of the movies Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them and the Harry Potter films full of tidbits about set design, costume design, art design, and other behind-the-scenes info with lots of full-color photos and illustrations. A quick read recommended for fans of the Harry Potter films and his magical world.

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Brandi T., Reference

Beyond the tiger mom : East-West parenting for the global age

Wednesday, October 26, 2016
Maya Thiagarajan
Beyond the tiger mom

Don’t let the title discourage you! I picked up this book when it first arrived, curious about the phrase “tiger mom”, quickly thumbed through the pages and decided this was information worth reading.  I currently have school aged kids and I was specifically drawn to the information related to the educational approach between Eastern and Western cultures. 

I was quite amazed at the differences between the education that students receive here, in the Eastern hemisphere, and the education that students receive in the Western hemisphere.  She spends the first few chapters discussing math and reading and answering questions such as, why is math more popular in Asia, and why are so many books for children and teens being published in the U.S.?  

After reading this book, it was clear each culture has vastly different strengths and weaknesses.  I appreciated the tips and resources she provided to help find the balance between the two cultures and find an educational style that works best for your child.  I have certainly taken some interesting ideas from reading this book.  

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Tanya H., Reference

Seinfeldia

Wednesday, September 21, 2016
Jennifer Keishin Armstrong
Seinfeldia

How a Show about Nothing Changed Everything

 

As an avid fan of Seinfeld, I was happy to discover this book. It is a detailed accounting of the creation of the show, as well as a behind-the-scenes story of the making of it. Jerry Seinfeld and Larry David went out for coffee and dreamed up the show, not really thinking that it would get very far. An NBC executive took a chance and ordered up four whole episodes to be broadcast in the summer of 1989 when not many people were watching anyway. It didn’t have a lot of viewers, but the critics liked it, so they ordered another half season to start in January the following year. It built from there, with more and more people watching “a show about nothing,” which was really about everything. Seinfeld and David drew stories from their everyday lives, mundane events that were made watchable because of the universal themes that everyone could relate to, such as waiting forever for a table at a restaurant, picking up dry cleaning, or returning an overdue library book--all the myriad boring details of life. The writers were instructed to write stories based on actual events in their lives, not to write like a normal sitcom. They would only be on staff for a year or two, because they would run out of material! All in all, a good read about a show that still resonates because of the timeless quality of the stories, and the great ensemble acting of Jerry, George, Elaine, and Kramer.  

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Pat P., Technical Services

The Age Fix

Saturday, September 17, 2016
Anthony Youn, MD
The Age Fix

We all would like to look younger, right? In this book, Dr. Youn gives you his advice on what works and what doesn't. He gives brand name suggestions on what to use. Some are under $20.00. If you're looking for more radiant and youthful looking skin, check out this book!

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Jan H., Technical Services

Duct Tape Parenting

Tuesday, September 6, 2016
Vicki Hoefle
Duct Tape Parenting

A Less is More Approach to Raising Respectful, Responsible, and Resilient Kids

 

This book has passed through my hands a couple of times, and even though my children are now young adults, I felt compelled to read it. It helped me to recognize my own parenting hang-ups like micromanaging, doing it myself so it's done "right", and bailing them out instead of letting them make their own mistakes and deal with the natural consequences. This is how you raise children who don't feel entitled to everything. I love the commonsense approach.

The focus of this book is to stop helicopter parenting, and to encourage parents to take a step back and allow children to learn from life lessons. Vicki Hoefle states that, "Duct Tape Parenting is a hands-off approach to parenting with a focus on developing and deepening the relationship between parents and kids without anyone feeling like a doormat or a dictator." She believes that the behaviors which get the most attention will continue to grow, whereas the behaviors that are ignored will fade away. Childhood is for learning and, through practice, kids learn skills for the real world. They also develop a sense of worth and self-confidence when their parents don’t cater to their every move.

There’s a new set of 3Rs for our kids—respect, responsibility, and resilience—to better prepare them for life in the real world. Once developed, these skills let kids take charge and let parents step back, to the benefit of all. Casting hover mothers and helicopter parents aside, Vicki Hoefle encourages a different, counterintuitive—yet much more effective—approach: for parents to sit on their hands, stay on the sidelines, even if duct tape is required, so that the kids step up. Duct Tape Parenting gives parents a new perspective on what it means to be effective, engaged parents and to enable kids to develop confidence through solving their own problems. This is not a book about the parenting strategy of the day—what the author calls "Post-It Note Parenting"—but rather a relationship-based guide to span all ages and stages of development. Witty, straight-shooting Hoefle addresses frustrated parents everywhere who are ready to raise confident, capable children to go out in the world.

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Marybeth K., Circulation

The Last True Story I’ll Ever Tell

Thursday, August 25, 2016
John Crawford
The Last True Story I’ll Ever Tell

An Accidental Soldier's Account of the War in Iraq

 

I went to university with guys that were paying for school by playing soldier a couple weekends a month. They loved it. Loved the weekends. Loved getting out of school debt free. Then we went to war and the government changed the deal. The National Guard was transformed into an active duty arm of the military. Reading John Crawford’s story hit home.

He tells the story of our Guardsmen who did not sign up to go to war. They were kept for longer tours than some of their career counterparts. They were not as well equipped nor supported. He tells a painful story from the point of view of a young soldier, not from a journalistic or political perspective. It is enlightening and informative.

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Cindy A., Circulation

 

Skin Cleanse

Tuesday, August 16, 2016
Adina Grigore
Skin Cleanse

The Simple, All-Natural Program for Clear, Calm, Happy Skin

 

"If you're like most women, you've been on a never-ending quest for perfect skin—or even just good skin—since adolescence. It's a frustrating pursuit to say the least, filled with one disappointing (and expensive) miracle solution after another. Why is it so hard to get good skin? Adina Grigore, founder of the organic skincare line S.W. Basics, would argue that getting clear, calm, happy skin is about much more than products and peels. Or, rather, it's about much less. In Skin Cleanse, she guides readers through a holistic program designed to heal skin from the inside out."

This book is informative and I especially like the chapters that include natural DIY skin care recipes.

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Tania K., Circulation

 

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