Fiction

Katy's New World

Thursday, July 22, 2010
Kim Vogel Sawyer

Books about the Amish and Mennonites are always interesting.   In this one Katy, a 14 year old Mennonite girl, is given permission to attend the public high school. She is given all kinds of rules  by her church leaders and her single parent father.  Katy struggles with wanting to learn and also fit in with some of her classmates.  The reader really gets  a feel for the kind of life the Mennonites live.   It is a young adult book but also of interest to adults and probably good 4th and 5th readers.

Sue N., Youth Services

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Big Girl

Thursday, July 22, 2010
Danielle Steele
This is a typical good read from Danielle Steel- she seems to keep cranking them out. Victoria has weight problems and a family with whom she looks nothing alike. When a new baby arrives who is perfect in the eyes of the parents, Victoria is belittled and made to feel ugly and useless. As she matures, her life changes and you see her making her way in spite of her very sad childlhood. I read this in two days, an easy summer read.

Sue N., Youth Services

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Pinkalicious

Thursday, July 22, 2010
Victoria Kann

As stated by the Library Journal, Pinkalicious eats so many pink cupcakes that she wakes up the next morning with pink skin and hair. The color just won't wash off, and the doctor diagnoses her with Pinkititis and tells her to eat green food to get better. Still, when her parents aren't looking, she sneaks just one more treat–and turns red. Startled, she starts to choke down her veggies and finally returns to normal. When everything seems okay, Daddy asks what happened to the other cupcakes, and Pinkalicious's little brother bounds into the room with one in hand, happily showing off his new pink skin!



This book is hilarious and was such a joy to share with my now three year old girl.  She quickly picked up the story and was able to read it to me and her stuffed animal friends.  I will have a wonderful memory to last a lifetime whenever I hear this title.  Listening through the door to my little girl reading to her toys after I have tucked her in for the night. “Now pay attention!” she says “You have Pinkititis, What you need is a steady diet of green food!”



Emily D., Circulation

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The Wild Zone

Thursday, July 15, 2010
Joy Fielding

Joy Fielding always writes exciting books with great characters.  Two brothers and a friend try to pull a scam on a woman they meet in a bar and it backfires on them.  The emotions and crazy actions of all the characters really pull you into this story.  A don't put down read.



Sue N., Youth Services

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The Perks of Being a Wallflower

Thursday, July 15, 2010
Stephen Chbosky

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is exactly what its name suggests; a fun, unusual and memorable novel. The entire book is a compilation of letters written by a boy who uses a false identity. As a reader, the recipient of the letters is never revealed, but Charlie’s life is captured quite poetically and comically in his many letters.

 

Unlike many teenage boys, Charlie is quiet, contemplative and unusually intelligent. His English teacher, who insists that Charlie call him Bill, becomes one of Charlie’s best friends. He urges Charlie to stop being a wallflower and just observing his own life. He inspires Charlie to actually participate.

 

This novel is entirely uplifting and joyful. Charlie’s letters could convey emotions in his life better than anything I have ever read, and inspired me to fully participate in my own.



Gabrielle M., Circulation

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Last Shot: A Final Four Mystery

Thursday, July 15, 2010
John Feinstein

We listened to this on a looong drive across Utah.  My husband, who generally doesn’t care for audiobooks actually told our 4-year-old daughter, (normally Daddy’s darling), to be quiet because he was listening to the story!  And now she knows who Coach K, while our son says “ABD – anybody BUT Duke.”



Grade 6-10 - This action-packed mystery is set at the NCAA Final Four men's basketball tournament. Eighth-graders Steven Thomas and Susan Carol Anderson are aspiring journalists and winners of the U.S. Basketball Writer's Association 14-and-under writing contest. Their prize is a trip, with press credentials and reporting responsibilities, to the Final Four in New Orleans. While exploring the Superdome, they overhear a blackmail threat leveled at Minnesota State University's star player. Threatened with a falsified transcript that would disqualify him and his team, Chip Graber is pressured to deliberately lose the final game against Duke. Stevie and Susan Carol become resourceful sleuths determined to save Chip and to expose the scandal. Throughout the story, famous basketball personalities make memorable guest appearances, including spirited sports analyst Tony Kornheiser and irrepressible commentator Dick Vitale. References to real players and coaches mingle, almost eerily, with the fictitious characters. Feinstein shares his extensive sports expertise, smoothly weaving into the tale a wealth of background information about NCAA regulations, tournament traditions, recruitment and eligibility issues, and gambling. Although the action on the court is vividly described, this story also breaks new ground for teens, focusing primarily on the influential role of media in promoting college basketball. Readers will enjoy the rivalry and chemistry between outspoken but insecure Stevie and savvy-beyond-her-years Susan Carol, and their spunky determination to get the scoop. Mystery fans will find enough suspense in this fast-paced narrative to keep them hooked.



Diane M., Administration

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The Art of Racing in the Rain (Book on CD)

Thursday, July 15, 2010
Garth Stein

Everyone knows a dog is a man's best friend. In this book, the dog narrating the story truly exemplifies that adage. (I listened to the audio edition.)  Enzo has a love of car racing just as Denny, the man in his life who is known for his skill at racing in the rain. After the death of his wife, Denny puts his racing career on the back burner while he fights his in-laws for custody of his daughter. Enzo is there for him throughout it all with compassion and fierce loyalty. You'll rejoice at the ending.



Doris, Reference

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Handle With Care

Thursday, July 15, 2010
Jodi Picoult

One overwhelming element resides in this novel; controversy. Like the majority of Jodi Picoult’s books, this one involves a court case, different perspectives, and clashing morals that tear apart a family. It was very readable and certainly made me think.


Willow is born with OI, or brittle bone syndrome. Even the simplest of activities can cause her to break, like a sneeze or rolling over in bed. The court case revolves around the quality of Willow’s life. Her mother is suing for wrongful birth. Her father flees to the opposing side to fight his wife in court. And Willow’s sister is elapsing into a bulimic and entirely unhealthy state of existence. The entire OI community regards Willow’s mother a trader for even considering that Willow’s life isn’t worth living, and the only person she could possibly turn to is her best friend, Piper-except Piper is the Ob-gyn doctor who is being sued.


This novel is wonderful. It’s deep and daunting, but the revolving perspectives offered all opinions I would never have even considered. This book is undeniably sad, but certainly worth reading.
 

Gabrielle M., Circulation

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Worst Case

Thursday, July 15, 2010
James Patterson
This is a typical James Patterson- short chapters, fast read, lots of suspense and mystery.  Children of wealthy New York City families are being targeted, abducted and murdered by a fanatic who thinks the whole world is doing wrong.  The city police and the FBI try to track him down before a last exciting scene in... no I won't tell this one, Read it for yourself and enjoy.
 
Sue N., Youth Services
 

A Dog's Life

Tuesday, July 6, 2010
Peter Mayle
A Dog's Life

This book takes place in France, and tells the story of a dog that escapes a cruel farm life. He lives off his wits in a village until a kind couple finds him and takes him home. The story is told by "him, the dog," and it is hilarious! A lovely book.

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Marilyn S., Circulation

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