Fiction

Orphan Train

Friday, May 8, 2015
Christina Baker Kline
Orphan Train

Here is a fictional account of what appears to have been a viable option for "parentless" children in our past - a past without the social safety nets we now have and expect (initiated by our federal government as part of FDR's plan for recovery). This is our past; could it be our future?

The book is an easy read at maybe a 5th grade reading level. Caution: there is a non-graphic description of a disturbing sexual assault on the narrator as a 10 year old.

"Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to “aging out” out of the foster care system. A community service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvenile hall. As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance. Molly discovers that she has the power to help Vivian find answers to mysteries that have haunted her for her entire life – answers that will ultimately free them both." Check our Catalog

Donna O., Reference

Me Before You

Friday, May 8, 2015
JoJo Moyes
Me Before You

 

Will Traynor is one of the main character, changed forever in the blink of an eye as he stepped out into traffic  one rainy London day. Now, Will is a quadriplegic who needs round-the-clock care for his physical ailments, but for his emotional state-of-mind his mother has hired Louisa Clark to be a companion to Will. Louisa is a simple girl who has lived her entire 26 years in the shadows a small English village. She likes to wear colorful clothes and bumble bee tights. She just lost her job at a café; her family relies on Louisa for income so she accepts a job as Will’s care giver for a six month time period. 

 What happens in this six month time period is the heart of this story. It is about two families and how they cope with what life has dealt them. It is about choices and being allowed to choose. It is about awakening and discovering life and all there is to take from it and not be afraid to really love and live.  There are thoughts that came to mind as I read this story…thoughts I had never entertained.  It is a struggle between choice of live or choice of being and the quality or lack of that goes with it.   The outcome was a struggle and this book is haunting to say the least in that I kept thinking about it days afterwards, wondering what decision I would have made in the same circumstances.

 The cover of the book is misleading – it looks like it would be a 1960’s type read when in fact, it is a morally divisive topic. This is a book you need to experience…you have to know that it won’t be the way you think it will turn out so you need to read it blind.  It will take you the entire book before you figure out what the title means. Check our Catalog

Sue H., Reference

The One and Only Ivan

Tuesday, May 5, 2015
Katherine Applegate
The One and Only Ivan

Inspired by the true story of a captive gorilla known as Ivan, this illustrated novel is told from the point of view of Ivan himself.  Yes I know, a story told by a gorilla, but his story is amazing!  Ivan was captured as a baby from the jungles of Africa and has spent the last twenty-seven years behind the glass walls of his enclosure in a shopping mall. Ivan has grown accustomed to humans watching him. He hardly ever thinks about his life in the jungle. Instead, Ivan occupies himself with television, his friends Stella and Bob, and painting. But when he meets Ruby, a baby elephant taken from the wild, he is forced to see his home, and his art, through new eyes.  The story evolves into a personal quest for Ivan to help Ruby, his new friend.

This book is a winner of the 2013 Newbery Medal. This stirring and unforgettable novel from renowned author Katherine Applegate celebrates the transformative power of unexpected friendship. The story is a compelling page turner.  You just want to keep reading!  The words are very powerful, yet the chapters are short, making it a great choice for kids who have a hard time staying engaged in a book.  Parts of the book are very sad and emotional, but the final outcome is a joyful one. Check our Catalog

Barb C., Technical Services

Florence Gordon

Friday, May 1, 2015
Brian Morton
Florence Gordon

Not everyone will like Florence. She is a cranky, blunt old feminist who is suddenly involved in her family's life after years of distance. This story had moments that made me laugh out loud, some that broke my heart, but in the end, warmed my heart. A great story of family dynamics. Check our Catalog

Sue A2, Reference

Red: A Crayon's Story

Friday, April 24, 2015
Michael Hall
Red: a crayon's story



If you enjoy picture books such as "The Day the Crayons Quit," you'll enjoy the book "Red".  A crayon with a red wrapper cannot seem to draw any color other than blue.  Red and red's teachers & parents get frustrated when red cannot draw a proper strawberry or collaborate with yellow to draw a proper sun.  When red is at his/her lowest, someone asks red to draw an ocean; red feels immensely proud at finally being able to draw something right and realizes that red can draw perfectly wonderful blue pictures.  A nice book to read-aloud to preschool-kindergarten aged children.  Check our Catalog



Janice H., Youth Services

The Auschwitz Escape

Monday, April 20, 2015
Joel C. Rosenberg
The Auschwitz Escape

This is an amazing book. I began reading on my nook but it expired after two weeks so I got it from the library and finished it. I didn't know anyone ever escaped and told about it. Of course it is fiction but  plausable and very gripping.  It has a lot of Polish history, World War II, and prison camp information. The main character, Jacob Weisz, is fascinating. I spent a lot of time reading this book when I should have been doing other things.

Check our catalog.

Sue N., Youth Services

An Irish Country Doctor

Thursday, April 16, 2015
Patrick Taylor
An Irish Country Doctor

This book took me to a charming village set in Northern Ireland in the 1960s.  Dr. Barry Laverty is fresh out of medical school and looking for a job when he encounters Dr. Fingal Flahertie O'Reilly.  Barry has a lot of lessons to learn from the older doctor.  Full of charming and likeable characters; first in a series of 9 books. Check our Catalog

Margaret B., Reference

Too Far

Monday, April 13, 2015
Mike Lupica
Too Far
   I don't follow sports. I don't read about sports generally.  This, though it is about sports, is more a terrifying suspense novel.  Ben Mitchell, has retired from journalism due to the terrible consequence of an important piece he wrote.  Wanting to get the story out there first, disregarding calls for compassion.  A young high school journalist seeks him out with what looks like a great story. 
 
  The high school basketball team is having a great season.  It looks like two of it's superstars are going onto BIG stuff.  But, there seems to be some ugliness.  The death of the team manager sparks the intrepid reporter into investigating what looks like horrific hazing. 
 
   This is a great read.  Makes you want to hold your kids close and protect them from those you entrust them with- their coaches, their teammates.
 
 
Cindy A., Circulation
 
 

The War That Saved My Life

Monday, April 13, 2015
Kimberly Brubaker Bradley
The War That Saved My Life

"This a beautifully woven story of a young British girl during World War II.  Ada was determined to overcome physical disability and emotional abuse in order to grow personally and contribute to her besieged homeland.  From caregiver to the wounded to part time detective, she became a real hero for all to admire and love."  Check our Catalog

Kate D. Youth Services

The Paris Winter

Friday, March 27, 2015
Imogen Robertson
The Paris Winter
  When we first meet Maud Heighton, she has come to Paris from rural England to study at an all-girls art academy.  Maud struggles on her meager allowance, living in a cold garret, often without enough to eat.  When a classmate, a Russian girl named Tonya, tells Maud of a chance to earn some money, she jumps at the opportunity.  At first it seems like a dream job, working for a wealthy Paris gentleman as a live-in companion for his young sister, Sylvie.  
 
     Unfortunately, all is not as it seems because Sylvie is an opium addict and a thief, and her brother lives a shady and dangerous existence.  Maud and Tonya are drawn into the peril of this world in the early part of the 20th century, with the great flood of Paris and the salon of Gertrude Stein in the background.
 
     The author, Imogen Robertson, has written a historical thriller that draws the reader in with its many dark twists and turns, set against the backdrop of the city of light.  Check our Catalog
 
Catherine T., reference
       

LIBRARY TWEETS

Follow Us on Twitter