Fiction

Our Souls At Night

Friday, November 6, 2015
Kent Haruf
Our Souls At Night

Kent Haruf's final novel , published posthumously, is an homage to love. While this lovely story may appear short and simple, it is not. I would not call this a romance novel, but rather an account of two members of the 'senior' generation who still have a lot of life to live. Addie and Louis come together to talk at night when they are the most lonesome, and find adventure in the simple things in life. Haruf has a way of making everyday things come to life with his beautiful writing. Check our Catalog

Sue A., Reference

The Reluctant Midwife

Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Patricia Harman
The Reluctant Midwife

During the Great Depression when West Virginia was hit hard, Becky Myers moves back to Hope River to help her friend and midwife Patience who is having a baby. Becky also is  responsible for her former employer, Dr. Blum, who has become disabled mentally after the death of his wife. Becky enjoys working with women but is needed as a midwife even though she prefers not to be in that capacity.  This historical novel of the 1930s  gives the reader a picture of the CCC and the people of this Appalachian region.  It is definitely a woman's novel and since I am a West Virginian, the book meant a lot to me,  I highly recommend it.  Check our Catalog

Sue N., Youth Services

Disposable Asset

Wednesday, October 28, 2015
John Altman
Disposable Asset

This book was a quick read with it's fast paced plot that kept the story moving.  At times during the story you find yourself somewhat rooting for Cassie even though she shouldn't be rooted for.  The story is about Cassie, a spy for the U.S. who completed her mission in Russia, trying to escape Russia and also preventing herself from being terminated by her bosses.  Check our Catalog

Jeremy E., Administration

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Monday, October 26, 2015
Betty Smith

I never would have read this wonderful book if I hadn’t read When Books Went to War. Man after man participating in the Armed Services Edition program mentioned this book as a favorite, piquing my curiosity. It didn’t disappoint. A coming-of-age story about Francie Nolan, the book also is a social history and commentary about growing up poor in an ethnic neighborhood in the early twentieth century. I couldn’t help but admire Francie for her industriousness and her unswerving drive for an education. But even more, I admired how she accepted her familial responsibility to help support her family but never gave up her dream of an education. Check our catalog.

Doris, Reference

The Lost Wife

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Alyson Richman
The Lost Wife

This book begins at the end of the story and then keeps you reading to see how it will all work out.  There are two main characters, Lenka, a Polish woman, who falls in  love during WW 2 and ends up in a Nazi ghetto.She chooses to stay with her family instead of leaving Poland with Josef and his family.  She survives a terrible life and in alternating chapters, we learn of Josef, who managed to get to America and become a successful obstretician.   Both of them went on with their lives and remarried but always had the other person in their hearts.  The reader learns of the two different lives and how they both connected.  This was a great read.  Check our Catalog

Sue N., Youth Services

Merida, Legend of the Emeralds

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Ellie O'Ryan
Merida, Legend of the Emeralds

My granddaughter who is 3 doesn't see much TV or many movies but she has seen Brave and likes the character Merida.  We have a new children's fiction called Merida, Legend of the Emeralds by Ellie O'Ryan. It is short and has some Disney illustrations and  think girls from grade 1 through 5 will enjoy reading it or have it read to them.  I really enjoyed it.

Sue N., Youth Services     Check our Catalog

Villa America

Wednesday, October 7, 2015
Lisa Klaussmann
Villa America

Villa America, a work of historical fiction, is the story of Sara and Gerald Murphy, an expat American couple who were the real-life inspirations for F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night. The Murphy’s built a house to escape to on the French Riviera called Villa America where they entertained their friends Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemmingway, John Dos Passos, Archibald MacLeish, Dorothy Parker as well as Pablo Picasso and Cole Porter, Gerald’s Yale roommate. These were the golden days of the 1920’s and life for this group of expats was filled with fabulous parties, champagne, and caviar. But underneath the glittering layers were people with real lives and real secrets whose idyllic world in Cap d’Antibes would ultimately end in tragedy and heartbreak. This is a great read, and I highly recommend it, particularly to anyone who enjoyed Paula McLain’s The Paris Wife.  

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Sue A., Reference

Esperanza Rising

Monday, October 5, 2015
Pam Munoz Ryan
Esperanza Rising

While working one evening at the library in youth services a young patron about eleven years old recommended to me Esperanza Rising.  What a great read. The story begins with Esperanza, a young girl about to turn 13 years old. Her parents own a very successful ranch called “El Rancho de las Rosas” in Aguascalientes, Mexico.   Esperanza leads a very carefree life. She had fancy clothes, a magnificent home, and servants to provide whatever she needed.  She had parents and a grandmother who adored her.  It was close to the big celebration of her thirteenth birthday when life for Esperanza changed from a fairytale to a nightmare.  The tragic death of her father, force Esperanza and her mother and some dedicated servants to leave their beloved El Rancho de las Rosas and seek refuge in California.  What they face in this new land of opportunity is poverty, sickness, grueling work, and prejudice.  How do they overcome all this… hope and faith.   Esperanza surely does rise!  Great book.  Check our Catalog

Kate D., Youth Services

George

Monday, October 5, 2015
Alex Gino
George

When people look at George, they see a boy but she knows she is really a girl.  Her best friend from elementary school, Kelly, understands and when George wants to play Charlotte in the class play, Charlotte's Web,  Kelly arranges it so she can play the part one time.
This book is so thoughtful and while reading it, I really could understand how transgender people feel and think.   It is important for teens and also adults.  Everyone should read it.  Check our Catalog
Sue N., Youth Services

Out of My Mind

Monday, September 21, 2015
Sharon Draper
Out of My Mind

Melody is a young girl with a lot to say.  Melody can’t speak so no one can hear what she is thinking.  She can’t write, nor can she physically express herself clearly.  She has cerebral palsy.  She is so frustrated at everyone treating her as if she were dumb, if they only knew!  In fifth grade she is able to move out of the class for the kids with “disabilities” and get mainstreamed for a few hours of the day.  She is in heaven not being asked to relearn the alphabet yet again, to actually be able to learn.   With the help of those close to her she gets a Medi-Talker, a computer that she can program to be her voice.  With this technology she is able to participate in classes and even in Whiz Kids.  The book is Melody’s autobiography.   She is eloquent.   It is painful to hear her frustrations and how she is seen by others and how she is treated, even when she is able to speak for herself.  If you read Wonder you will appreciate Out of my Mind.  It truly should be required reading for all of us who need a dose of gratitude for how good we have it and for appreciating what those different from us have to offer.

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Cindy A., Circulation

 

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