Teen

Prisoner B-3087

Wednesday, January 20, 2016
Gratz, Alan
Prisoner B-3087

Based on the life of Jack Gruener we gain the experience of a young Jewish Pole.  Incredibly, he experienced and survived the Holocaust; the initial sweeps, the ghetto, and ten different concentration camps.  Told from Jack's perspective we see things not as cold history, but heart wrenching pain of a young boy robbed of his youth and what he forfeits of his humanity to survive. The story seems so unlikely, you think the author has really taken liberties for the shock value.  No, it was thoroughly researched and closely based on Jack's experience. Prisoner B-3087 is well done, a definite must-read.

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Cindy A., Circulation

 

Beauty: A retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast

Tuesday, December 22, 2015
Robin McKinley
Beauty: A retelling of the Story of Beauty and the Beast

I read this as an assignment for our department and thoroughly enjoyed it.  There were over 200 pages of detail about how Beauty ended up in the beautiful castle and how the magic affected her life. Then I went back to other Beauty and the Beast books and compared them to this very detailed one.  Fascinating reading, I recommend it for teens and adults. Check our Catalog

Sue N., Youth Services

These Broken Stars

Tuesday, December 22, 2015
Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner
These Broken Stars

These Broken Stars has a little bit of everything in it:  science fiction, romance, steampunk…  The story begins aboard a massive luxury spaceliner (think Titanic) which quickly encounters disaster.  Two very different people are the only survivors.  They land on a beautiful but, apparently, deserted planet.  Lilac and Tarver are forced to rely on each other to survive and find a way home.  I thought the book was well written and enjoyed reading it.  I’m looking forward to the next one. Check our Catalog

Laura G., Youth Services

Hate List

Friday, November 6, 2015
Jennifer Brown
Hate List

I hope the teens are reading this book and I recommend it for adults.  It tells the story of a school shooting, told from the views of the shooter's girlfriend.  It is an amazing book into the culture of high school today and the thoughts of teenagers.  It was published in 2009  but still current now with all the school shootings  Please read this book. Check our Catalog

Sue N., Youth Services

These Broken Stars

Monday, October 5, 2015
Amie Kaufman & Meagan Spooner
These Broken Stars

These Broken Stars has a little bit of everything in it:  science fiction, romance, steampunk…  The story begins aboard a massive luxury spaceliner (think Titanic) which quickly encounters disaster.  Two very different people are the only survivors.  They land on a beautiful but, apparently, deserted planet.  Lilac and Tarver are forced to rely on each other to survive and find a way home.  I thought the book was well written and enjoyed reading it.  I’m looking forward to the next one.   Laura G., Youth Services           Check our Catalog

George

Monday, October 5, 2015
Alex Gino
George

When people look at George, they see a boy but she knows she is really a girl.  Her best friend from elementary school, Kelly, understands and when George wants to play Charlotte in the class play, Charlotte's Web,  Kelly arranges it so she can play the part one time.
This book is so thoughtful and while reading it, I really could understand how transgender people feel and think.   It is important for teens and also adults.  Everyone should read it.  Check our Catalog
Sue N., Youth Services

Out of My Mind

Monday, September 21, 2015
Sharon Draper
Out of My Mind

Melody is a young girl with a lot to say.  Melody can’t speak so no one can hear what she is thinking.  She can’t write, nor can she physically express herself clearly.  She has cerebral palsy.  She is so frustrated at everyone treating her as if she were dumb, if they only knew!  In fifth grade she is able to move out of the class for the kids with “disabilities” and get mainstreamed for a few hours of the day.  She is in heaven not being asked to relearn the alphabet yet again, to actually be able to learn.   With the help of those close to her she gets a Medi-Talker, a computer that she can program to be her voice.  With this technology she is able to participate in classes and even in Whiz Kids.  The book is Melody’s autobiography.   She is eloquent.   It is painful to hear her frustrations and how she is seen by others and how she is treated, even when she is able to speak for herself.  If you read Wonder you will appreciate Out of my Mind.  It truly should be required reading for all of us who need a dose of gratitude for how good we have it and for appreciating what those different from us have to offer.

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Cindy A., Circulation

 

The shadow cabinet

Thursday, July 30, 2015
Maureen Johnson
The shadow cabinet

I read Shadow Cabinet by Maureen Johnson recently and it has me anxious for the next book to be released! It is the third book of the Shades of London series. It is mysterious and makes you wonder about the world we live in. Shadow Cabinet is a wild adventure about the supernatural world. I strongly recommend it to anyone with an interest in mysterious stories. Check our Catalog

Bree K., Circulation

Endangered

Friday, September 26, 2014
Eliot Schrefer
Endangered

Sophie is back visiting her mom for the summer.  On the ride from the airport to the Bonobo sanctuary her mom established she stops at the sight of a man selling a very distressed infant Bonobo.  Thinking she is helping, she buys the infant and takes it to the sanctuary.  Her good deed undoes work her mom had done to decrease the killing of adults to acquire infants to sell.  The infant slowly bonds with Sophie as she becomes his surragote mother.  Civil war breaks out and Sophie must choose to save herself and go back to her father in the U.S. or stay so the baby Bonobo has a chance of survival.   Eliot Schefer describes beautifully this matriarchal Bonobo society and how we are effecting it.  His description of the fictional civil war in the Congo is graphic.  This is an amazing book, describing a place and animals few of us will ever experience with exquisite care and love.  It was a finalist for the Natioonal Book Award.

I am now reading aloud to my boys Schrefer's amazing book Threatened.  It is entirely different as it is set in Gabon and describes life there and the aggressive chimpanzee population.  If you care about the environment, primates, our realtionship to other species, are interested in life in African countries you must read these two works of art.  Check our Catalog

Cindy A., Circ.

Stolen

Friday, September 19, 2014
Lucy Christopher
Stolen

It happened like this. I was stolen from an airport. Taken from everything I knew, everything I was used to. Taken to sand and heat, dirt and danger. And he expected me to love him.

This is my story.

A letter from nowhere. 

Sixteen year old Gemma is kidnapped from Bangkok airport and taken to the Australian Outback. This wild and desolate landscape becomes almost a character in the book, so vividly is it described. Ty, her captor, is no stereotype. He is young, fit and completely gorgeous. This new life in the wilderness has been years in the planning. He loves only her, wants only her. Under the hot glare of the Australian sun, cut off from the world outside, can the force of his love make Gemma love him back? 

The story takes the form of a letter, written by Gemma to Ty, reflecting on those strange and disturbing months in the outback. Months when the lines between love and obsession, and love and dependency, blur until they don't exist – almost.

*************

This is such an emotional, gripping and addictive book.   I was hooked on this story from the beginning and despite how I knew nothing good would come of it, I could not put it down.

This book is written like a letter, aletter to her captor, which means that she is referring to him which allows the reader to take part in the story.

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Josie H., Circulation

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