Boundless: Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage

Tuesday, March 1, 2016
Kathleen Winter
Boundless: Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage

Kathleen Winter had recently packed a “getaway suitcase” in hopes of traveling when she received an invitation to be a writer on board a ship cruising the “Northwest Passage.” This educational voyage carried other resource staff such as marine biologists, geologists, birdwatchers, and cultural ambassadors (heritage). Kathleen was a long-time resident of Newfoundland, but now she was given the chance to travel closer to the Arctic Circle via Greenland, Baffin Bay, Beechey Island, Prince of Wales Island, King William Island, and Bathurst Inlet. This route was historically unsuccessfully travelled by Sir John Franklin and his entourage of two ships in 1845 in the hopes of finding a northern route “to the Orient.” Kathleen experienced setting foot on “ancient” land that indigenous people inhabited the best way they could, considering glacial melt was making their food sources (polar bears and seals) scarce. Unfortunately, she also experienced a panic when the ship ran aground. This happened because parts of the Northwest Passage were not charted or landmasses had shifted. Her journey's tale is told in Boundless: Tracing Land and Dream in a New Northwest Passage.

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Geralyn B., Technical Services

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